E150- Caramel

We were gently awoken from our slumbers by the gurgling waters of the River Corrib that once powered the machinery of Persse Distillery on Nun’s Island. This long closed Galway distillery inspired the members of The Galway Whiskey Trail to successfully launch The Famous Galway Bay Irish Whiskey at last evenings extravaganza.

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Persse Distillery c/oGalway Whiskey Trail

If our hotel room had been around about 100 years ago we could have inhaled the rich malt aromas hovering in the air as the distillery was only a stones throw across the river.

As it happened it was the enticing smell of a freshly cooked breakfast that eventually got us out of the bed to face the day ahead.

Apart from a few drunkenly made arrangements to meet up with some of the launch party crew – which always seem a bit ambitious in the cold light of day – our time was free. Herself however had plans to purchase a new rig out for an upcoming wedding so out shopping it was. Luckily after a few boutiques I made my excuses and headed to another kind of shop more suitable for my tastes – McCambridges.

Being a member of The Galway Whiskey Trail – which I’d previously visited in January – I knew they had an extensive range of whiskeys in their off-licence department. Also knowing The Famous Galway Bay Irish Whiskey hailed from West Cork Distillers – I was curious to find out what their own label West Cork 10 Year Old Single Malt tasted like in comparison.

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West Cork Single Malt c/omalt-review

McCambridges had plenty of Galway Bay in stock but had sold out of West Cork. Luckily there was still some spirit left in the sample bottle so a small taster soon appeared before me.

Oh dear!

Now a 10 year old aged in ex-bourbon casks is going to be a bit vanilla sweet – but this was way too sweet.

A look at the small print on the back confirmed my suspicions – E150 – or added caramel to you and me.

I’ve read that added caramel is a tried and tested practice mainly used to darken light coloured blends to give a uniform colour across many barrels and vats.

I’ve read that in small quantities you can’t taste it.

I’m afraid to say – as Heather Greene implies in her highly informative book “Whisk(e)y Distilled” – that as you’re palate develops you can.

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Whisk(e)y Distilled c/othewhiskeynut

There’s just too much added caramel in this single malt for my liking which gives it an unbalanced taste experience. It may have been a perfectly fine whiskey without E150 so why add it?

West Cork Distillers seem to quite like using caramel. They are not alone.

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Glen Orchy c/othewhiskeynut

Just the other day I bought a bottle of budget price Scotch by the name of Glen Orchy from a German Supermarket. On tasting some I immediately thought it had the flavour profile of a Richard ‘The Nose‘ Paterson blend all over it. Soft, mellow and caramel sweetness. On doing some research into it’s origins I found it shared the common Glasgow postcode with many other whisky brands – G2 5RG. Suffice to say the headquarters of Whyte & Mackay are based here too – along with Dalmore, Jura and 30 others.

I’m sure there is caramel in Galway Bay – but the port finish gives it a much more balanced result.

1 nil to Galway Bay.

Satisfaction piqued – I met up with Mrs Whiskey. A tentative suggestion of drinks and a snack in the warm sunshine outside one of the Galway Whiskey Trail venues was accepted so Tigh Neachtain‘s won out in this instance.

A white wine for the lady was duly ordered along with the appealingly named Bogman Irish Craft Ale I hadn’t encountered before.

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Bogman Ale c/othewhiskeynut

Bogman turned out to be very enjoyable indeed. Not too strong at 4.9% ABV with a satisfying malty flavour. Good work from those at Spiddal River Brewery. Herself enjoyed her wine too!

We wondered if anyone else would bother to turn up from the night before – and then one appeared – followed shortly by another!

There were warm greetings all round with banter about the Galway Bay launch where we had all met followed by yet more drinks – and a tasty lunchtime meal.

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Te Bheag blend from Gaelic Whisky c/o whiskeynut

I had another whiskey this time. Te Bheag is an entry level peated Scottish blend from Skye which I’d previously encountered at Whiskey Live Dublin. My palate has obviously developed as unlike my previous tasting – I got a dose of added caramel sweetness this time round.

Inishowen 1 – others nil.

Having the craic and shooting the breeze couldn’t have been more enjoyable. During the course of our stay on this busy pedestrian intersection many people came and went. An immaculately groomed – both male and female – wedding party stopped by for a pint and some photos. I had a chance to chat with the barman after walking out without paying on my last visit!  We met one of The Galway Hooker skippers from the whiskey launch lastnight and to crown it all – a stunningly blue eyed musician serenaded one of our party after a throw away comment.

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Thomas Wesley Stern in Galway c/othewhiskeynut

Turns out Thomas Wesley Stern are a travelling band from the Pine Barrens region of New Jeresy who had only arrived in town from Sligo and were heading to Lisdoonvarna later.

They soon had a small crowd of admirers outside Tigh Neachtain’s and garnished much applause – along with a pint for their troubles. Here they are singing a whiskey related song.

Alas a short downpour interrupted the proceedings and broke the spell.

Thoughts of returning to the real world with it’s attended chores clouded the mind and goodbyes with promises to stay in touch were exchanged.

The Galway Whiskey Trail certainly lives up to it’s description in providing an experience you cannot buy.

Together with the fabulous launch of The Famous Galway Bay Irish Whiskey it had been an absolutely stunningly entertaining weekend.

The combination of festivities, friendliness and fun are what it’s all about.

When will you visit the trail to capture the craic for yourself?

Slainte.

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4 thoughts on “E150- Caramel”

  1. I would love the opportunity to sample the same whisky with and without e150. I’m not a big enough wanker to refuse to drink anything with added caramel colouring in it, but I would like to know if I could taste the difference myself. Blind tasting of course.

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    1. The prevalence of caramel in both blends AND single malts is somewhat shocking.
      Laphroig, Jura and many others have it.
      WHY?
      If sold in UK or Ireland there is no requirement to list it on the bottle.
      WHY NOT?
      The transparency issue raised by Compass Box opens many doors.

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  2. Sorry for digging into old post but I have to say that e150 is way too common in whiskies nowadays. Even Lagavulin 16yo is infused with it. If you want to try your whisk(e)y without it. Try any Kilchoman’s products. They are pretty good whiskies too.

    Liked by 1 person

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