Category Archives: Tullamore DEW

The Brewery Tap Tullamore

The Brewery Tap is one of those pubs that I’ve passed by on numerous occasions – mainly during my day job as a truck driver – but never managed to actually get inside – until now.

Situated opposite the busy O’Connor Square area in the heart of Tullamore town The Brewery Tap is only a stone’s throw from The Bridge Centre shopping complex and the popular Bridge House Hotel – both premises built on or around the old Tullamore Distillery which closed it’s doors in 1954.

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Tullamore Distillery Manager’s House c/othewhiskeynut

Remnants of the distillery can still be seen on nearby Patrick Street where the manager, Daniel E Williams – whose initials formed the DEW element – sat in his office which still proudly displays his name today on one side of the street overlooking the elaborate and well cared for iron gates which formed part of the entrance to the original distillery on the other.

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Tullamore Distillery gates c/othewhiskeynut

It should come as no surprise then that The Brewery Tap strongly features the entire Tullamore DEW range of tasty whiskeys inside it’s warm and welcoming interior.

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Whiskey in The Brewery Tap c/othewhiskeynut

Having missed the opportunity to try out the 14 Year Old Single Malt when I last visited The Old Bonded Warehouse – itself only a 5 minute walk away – I wasn’t going to let this chance go by – and in memory of the recently departed George Martin – a Beatles track.

Now on the blind tasting I did some time ago a few Tullamore DEW expressions stood out from the crowd. Both The Phoenix and Cider Cask releases scored very well so when I first gently nosed the 14 to be greeted by some wonderful aromas I knew I was in for a treat.

The silky smooth dram tantalised my taste buds with it’s warm sweetness combined in a delicate balance of the bourbon – port – oloroso and madeira barrels used for maturation.

Triple distilled – quadruple matured – quintuple the taste!

To paraphrase an advertising slogan for my own experience in drinking this lovely whiskey.

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Liquid nectar c/othewhiskeynut

This may be my best Tullamore DEW  yet!

Other whiskeys on offer at The Brewery Tap included the Egan’s Single Malt. Judging from the amount of P&H Egan advertising materiel adorning the walls of the bar there’s plenty of scope for the new company to expand their drinks portfolio. Ales – ginger beer and liqueurs all featured in the ads from yesteryears. I just wonder what they all tasted like in their heyday?

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Egan’s adverts c/othewhiskeynut

Outside of lunchtimes The Brewery Tap only serves crisps and nuts. There is a regular itinerary of musical evenings and other lively events both mid-week and at the weekend. It’s also rumoured that many of the Tullamore DEW executives pop in for some down time to enjoy the fruits of their own labours – and who can blame them?

With a warm glowing fire – friendly staff – comfortable seats and cushioned benches as well as whiskey aplenty – who wouldn’t enjoy the atmosphere in such a fine establishment.

I just hope my next visit won’t be as long in coming as my first!

Sláinte.

Good Logo

 

Tullamore DEW Visitors Centre

A high pressure weather system had been sitting over Ireland for a few days bringing with it a welcome dose of sunshine after months of wet, dank, grey days.

My first thought was to ‘Run To The Hills’. More in a hiking boots and compass kind off way rather than a leather and studs Iron Maiden rock out!

But herself had other plans. A weekend of gardening was the order of the day.

By Sunday afternoon the lawn had been cut. Hedges had been trimmed and all the mess tidied up so lunch out was proposed.

A suggestion of a meal at the Tullamore DEW Visitors Centre was accepted. Despite herself having worked in Tullamore for a few years – she had never visited the Old Bonded Warehouse by the Grand Canal and I thought it would be a great place to show her.

The sun was still shining a half hour later when we arrived and the solid wooden benches on the boardwalk outside the centre were very attractive – just a shame there was still a spring chill in the air. We decided to head indoors.

The warmly wooded interior complete with whiskey barrels adorning the walls together with Tullamore DEW mirrors and old photographs was very impressive. We both took a few pictures before the friendly and helpful staff greeted us .

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Tullamore Dew mirror c/othewhiskeynut

The tempting food menu soon appeared and we ordered up a few tasty treats.

This gave me an opportunity to check out the gift shop where the entire range of Tullamore DEW whiskeys were on show.

Pride of place was given to the relatively new 14 Year Old Single Malt. A triple distilled offering finished in Bourbon – Oloroso – Madiera and Port barrels.

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Pride of place 14 year old single malt c/othewhiskeynut

As I was the designated driver I didn’t indulge but did get the sales talk from the crew.

Also on show were;

The flagship Tullamore DEW Original. Triple distilled – triple blended using 3 types of grain –  and triple cask matured too.

Tullamore Dew Trilogy 15 Year Old. A blend additionally finished in rum casks.

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Trilogy time at Tullamore c/othewhiskeynut

The award winning Phoenix 55% blend.

The hard to find 12 Year Old Sherry Finish Single Malt.

The Tullamore DEW 10 Year Old Single Malt.

The Tullamore Dew Cider Cask which is selling very well according to the staff and of course,

Tullamore Dew Old Bonded Warehouse release.

All of these were available at the bar too where a selection of wines – craft beers and ciders – plus a sprinkling of Scottish whiskies from the parent group William Grant & Sons included Glenfiddich – Grants – Monkey Shoulder and a Balvenie 12.

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Bar highlights at Tullamore c/othewhiskeynut

A shout from my wife alerted me to our meal. I enjoyed my beef steak with whiskey sauce whilst herself had a pulled pork bap and chips. Decent pub grub to enjoy a glass or two of the hard stuff if only I wasn’t driving!

Despite not adhering to my Whiskey Bar criteria of an earlier blog – I do think the visitors centre is eligible for honorary membership of that club by virtue of it’s historic and picturesque location. Serving the in-house range of whiskeys plus parents selection too. And the general buzz of the place as visitors  – who are generally all whiskey fans of one sort or another – congenially come and go before and after their guided tours.

You don’t have to go on the tour to enjoy the delights of the restaurant – bar or outside seating area. Just get there before the closing time of 5pm on Sundays and 6pm otherwise.

A final touch to our day was the tie-in with a local chocolate producer in nearby Ferbane who has infused their dark chocolate with Tullamore DEW whiskey to create a wonderfully rich sweet treat to finish off our enjoyable stay.

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Yummy chocolate! c/othewhiskeynut

Do yourself a favour.

Choose a day when the sun is shining.

Sit outside by the banks of the tranquil Grand Canal where once the barges busily loaded the whiskey to transport it around the world in the early 1900’s.

Work your way through the tasty Tullamore Dew expressions fortified by a hearty meal and savour the sights – smells – aromas and experiences of Tullamore both past and present.

You won’t regret it!

Slainte

 

Good Logo

 

Tullamore DEW

Tullamore DEW is another one of those iconic Irish Whiskey Brands that are well represented across the globe. On my last trip to Germany it was everywhere – and from sampling some German whisky I can see why the light, smooth triple distilled dram goes down well there. It is a pleasantly approachable blend appreciated neat – or mixed – according to your taste.

Formerly made in the Irish Midland town of Tullamore – where there was a booming whiskey industry in the 19th Century. The 1837 Ordnance Survey map lists no fewer than 2 distilleries along with 3 breweries – as well as the associated maltings. However – by the 1950’s only Tullamore DEW survived – and it too succumbed to economic pressure to close – along with many others in the Midlands by 1954.

Unlike it’s close neighbour Kilbeggan – which was turned into a piggery after it closed at one stage but now holds one of the original pot stills used at Tullamore – the Tullamore DEW brand continued to be produced at other distilleries – mainly the Midleton New Distillery. The brand changed hands a few times – eventually ending up being bought by the Scottish William Grant & Sons in 2010.

New Tullamore Distillery c/o Whiskey Nut
New Tullamore Distillery c/o Whiskey Nut

Grants – one of a few family owned drinks business in Scotland and worthy of a blog all of their own – brought about the rebirth of distilling in Tullamore by investing over 35 million in building a new plant on the N52 bypass so after a 60 year hiatus – whiskey can now flow again in Tullamore.

Interestingly – in Dundalk – at the northern extremity of the N52 – John Teeling is currently building his Great Northern Distillery!

Tullamore DEW visitors centre c/o Whiskey Nut
Tullamore DEW visitors centre c/o Whiskey Nut

Anyway – a trip to the Tullamore Visitors Centre on Bury Quay is a marvelous experience. Built in the former bonded warehouse it now contains a fabulous restaurant – worthy of a meal regardless whether you do the tour or not – the ubiquitous shop – as well as many original artefacts, photos and whiskey material collected from the rich history of distilling in the Midlands.

For those that want to delve into that history a little more need only to walk up the attractive canal a few steps to the Offaly Historical Society shop where many an article, book or pamphlet has been written on the whiskey trade – as well many other subjects relating to  County Offaly and the Midlands.

Former Tullamore DEW offices c/o Whiskey Nut
Former Tullamore DEW offices c/o Whiskey Nut

Tullamore town literally drips with whiskey heritage. If the former distillery head office on Patrick Street – derelict maltings at the back of the Bridge Shopping Centre at Water Lane – Distillery Lane itself leave you thirsty – then call in at The Brewery Tap pub which graces the  “Give every man his DEW” sign outside and Tullamore’s finest whiskey expressions inside – where you can relax with a dram browsing a whiskey book bought from the nearby Midlands Books.

Give Every Man His DEW c/o Whiskey Nut
Give Every Man His DEW c/o Whiskey Nut

And talking of a dram – at the end of the informative tour in the visitors centre a dram – or 3 in this case – is exactly what you get!

On the day of my visit my fellow guests and I were guided through the following expressions;

Tullamore DEW Original c/o Celtic Whiskey Shop
Tullamore DEW Original c/o Celtic Whiskey Shop

The flag bearing Tullamore DEW Original blend. A light, smooth blend which sets the benchmark for other Irish blends.

Tullamore DEW Phoenix c/o Celtic Whiskey Shop
Tullamore DEW Phoenix c/o Celtic Whiskey Shop

The Tullamore DEW Phoenix. The name can be both attributed to the rise in fortunes of whiskey in Tullamore due to the new distillery building – or – according to some sources – the 1st aviation disaster in the world occurring in the town in 1785! The whiskey packs a punch at 55% ABV so a little water may be required.

Tullamore DEW Warehouse Release c/o Tullamore DEW
Tullamore DEW Warehouse Release c/o Tullamore DEW

The Tullamore DEW Old Bonded Warehouse was my favourite. Smooth fine tasting with a nice body to it. The fact that it can only be acquired at the visitors centre is also a draw – so I got 2 – one for myself and the other for my Dad on Father’s Day!

There are other releases; a 10 year old Single Malt, a 12 year old Special Reserve are listed on the website – but the 12 year old sherry finish single malt is not – despite being sold at the visitors centre as well as Dublin Airport. Is it because it was made at Bushmills? – and therefore not part of the “in crowd”. It seems to be popular in Germany – so I’ll let Horst tell you all about it as I’ve just got back from a whisky trip there.

Tullamore DEW Cider Cask c/o The Spirits Business
Tullamore DEW Cider Cask c/o The Spirits Business

The new expression yet to prove it’s mettle is the Tullamore Dew Cider Cask. Only available at Dublin Airport for a limited period I have yet to sample a dram. It isn’t currently on sale at the visitors centre. Said to be the 1st whiskey aged in cider casks in Ireland – this is a bold experiment in taste, style and content – I certainly admire Tullamore for releasing it. Whether it’s any good or not will have to wait and see – but the feedback I’m getting is positive.

Grants – the new Tullamore owners – have been innovative and bold distillers in their time. Cider Cask may have something to do with the new owners. It isn’t as yet spirit from the New Distillery – that will be a few years yet – but could be “premiumisation” of Midleton stocks secured in the sales deal – or simply keeping the brand in the market.

Whatever the reason – Tullamore DEW whiskey has a bright future.

The expressions are good.

The Visitors centre is great and as we say in Ireland,

The craic is mighty!

Get youself a bottle of Tullamore DEW today and have some craic!

Slainte

Whiskey Nut

Tullamore D.E.W. Unveils A World-First Cider Cask Finish Irish Whiskey

A new expression from Tullamore! – (via Midleton)

DRINKS ENTHUSIAST

CIDER CASK 2015-2

Tullamore D.E.W. – the original triple distilled, triple blend Irish Whiskey – has unveiled the world’s first cider cask finished Irish whiskey – Tullamore D.E.W. Cider Cask Finish.

This unique whiskey combines two of Ireland’s oldest crafts, cider-making and whiskey-making. The result  is a rare blend that brings the senses on a journey – straight to the heart of Ireland. Tullamore D.E.W. Cider Cask Finish is a triple distilled, triple blend Irish whiskey infused with notes of toasted oak and tinged with cider sweetness to engage and delight the palate of Irish whiskey lovers everywhere.

John Quinn, Tullamore D.E.W. Global Brand Ambassador, commented; “To create Tullamore D.E.W. Cider Cask Finish, we selected the finest apples, which were then freshly pressed and held in oak casks for several months. As the cider fermented, the tart-yet-sweet notes infused the bourbon casks. We then siphoned all the fermenting cider, replacing it with Tullamore…

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