Tag Archives: AC/DC

AC/DC Thunderstruck Tequila, Blanco, 40%

Let There Be Rock!

I’ve been enjoying AC/DC’s brand of rock from the mid 1970’s.

Bon Scott was the singer back then – for the last live shows Axel Rose was fronting – but Brian Johnson is back for their latest release – Power Up.

I’ve been enjoying Tequila ever since encountering it on a WSET course.

Exploring the different flavours & heritage of Mexican Tequila has expanded my knowledge & appreciation of distilled spirits.

Thunderstruck! c/othewhiskeynut

Combining music & drink together just seems natural – so sipping on Thunderstruck Tequila while strolling down memory lane listening to early AC/DC was a joyous interlude in an otherwise chaotic world.

Tequila is a highly regulated industry.

Have A Drink On Me! c/othewhiskeynut

It can only be made in certain areas of Mexico from blue agave – 100% in Thunderstruck’s case – and always shows the distillery of origin on the bottle – NOM 1472 here – allowing you to look up what other brands the distillery makes – over 20!

Thunderstruck comes in several varieties – I went for the Blanco – or unaged – looking for the influence of the raw ingredients on the distillation process. When you start maturing in wood – Reposado & Anejo – the cask influence can often impart flavours similar to that found in aged whiskey – and I was looking for something different.

Get It Hot c/othewhiskeynut

The bottle is suitably chunky & solid – much like the music.

The liquid is clear & colourless – as expected.

The nose is rich & pungent – redolent of agave – earthy with a touch of pepper on the back.

An oily mouth coating palate.

The peppery spice gradually bursts through – much like Angus strutting his heavy guitar solos from the solid back beat of the rhythm section.

This is no nonsense Tequila from a no nonsense rock band!

I think I’ve just been Thunderstruck!

Sláinte

Bell’s 21 Year Old Royal Reserve, Blend, 40%

I picked up this unusual bottle of Bell’s in a job lot auction win of miniatures.

Having tasted a few that had clearly ‘turned‘, I’d resisted opening this one as the fill level seemed low – a sure sign things were not good inside.

Only when the magnifying glass picked out 3cl on the rather sparse label – total 15 words – did I get my hopes up.

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Bell’s 21yo Royal Resreve c/othewhiskeynut

Could I be in for a treat?

Sadly – my nose said not!

Like opening a long closed cupboard – an intense rank foostiness assaulted me.

Undeterred – I ploughed on.

The palate started off dull – but a richness of depth, warming vanilla, oaky woodiness & a solid alcoholic kick greeted me.

Oh to have enjoyed this one in it’s prime!

Even on the turn there’s an attractiveness to the flavours within this Bell’s.

A joyous prickly heat danced off the palate on the satisfyingly long finish.

This must have been a belter in it’s day!

Hells Bells!

 

Sláinte

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The Mania in Tasmania was fierce

No whisky trip to Australia would be complete without a visit to Tasmania. The island off the bottom right hand corner of the continent is home to the tastiest and most lauded single malts Australia has to offer.

It’s also where the modern rebirth of whisky down under began. Bill Lark lobbied to get outdated liquor laws changed to allow the legal distillation of spirits to begin back in 1992.

Since those early amatuer days the industry has grown to produce many fine single malts. The pinnacle undoubtedly was Sullivans Cove winning Best Single Malt of the year in 2014.

My visit only scratched the surface of the stunning scenery, endemic wildlife, fine food and fabulous whisky that Tasmania has to offer – and the combination of it all left us – well – Thunderstruck!

The short flight from Melbourne soon had us looking down on the heavily wooded and indented coastline near Hobart. As the sun shone brightly – albeit with a cool breeze – we decided to head straight down the Tasman Peninsular to take advantage of the lovely weather.

Soon immersed in the awe inspiring landscape we quickly passed by some distilleries;

Nonesuch Distillery, makers of Dry Gin, Sloe Gin and Sloe Malt , had their closed sign up at the entrance.

Port Arthur Lavender, a distillery making perfumed products. Open but passed this by.

McHenry Distillery, actual whisky distillers! Along with gin and vodka – but closed due to construction of a visitors centre. Despite coming across their new single malt on Brooke Street Pier in Hobart it was only available by the bottle – so I never did get a taster of the contents.

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McHenry Single Malt c/othewhiskeynut

We also came across a small flock of Green Rosellas feeding on the ground. These very colourful birds -along with about a dozen other species – are only found in Tasmania and it was a joy to see them.

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Green Rosella c/othewhiskeynut

Our destination of the day at Port Arthur Penal Colony encapsulated the historic beginnings of modern Tasmania in all it’s  gory detail – yet set in stunning scenery. Gently ambling around we soon heard and later spotted our first Kookaburra of the trip.

Getting dark at about 5pm in the Australian winter came as a shock after leaving the Irish summer where 11pm was lights out. We still had to check in at our hotel. Phone coverage wasn’t great so we hightailed it back to Hobart – thankfully not encountering any wildlife along the way to add to the roadkill we saw in the sunshine.

The sparkling lights of Hobart glittering on the hillside beyond were a beautiful sight as we drove over the graceful Tasman Bridge. Very soon afterwards we felt the warm embrace of The Customs House Hotel.

I felt an even warmer embrace after enjoying a lovely meal in the cosy dining area heated by a homely open fire overlooking Hobart’s docklands – especially as the meal was washed down by some tasty Tassie whisky!

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Some Customs House Hotel whisky c/othewhiskeynut

Having previously tasted the Hellyers Road Peated expression – which I enjoyed very much – I kicked off with their 10 year old Original bottling. Aged in ex-bourbon casks, non chill-filtered at 46.2% this is a lovely smooth and rich example of a decent single malt. It just didn’t have the peat bite I liked.

Overeem Sherry Cask was my night cap. Distilled in nearby Blackmans Bay – a suburb of Hobart – this offering also had a rich taste with a  more heavy mouthfeel. It was less sweet than the Hellyers – which suited me fine.

The mania of Tasmania continued over the next few days. We crammed in as much sights and sounds as we could manage before rushing back in the dark to the warm delights of Hobart.

One of the crowning glories of our time in Tasmania – outside of the fabulous whiskies – were the wonderful breakfasts at The Customs House Hotel. These set the benchmark for the rest of our trip which was only matched by a hearty brunch in an eaterie up the wonderful laneway that is Centre Place in Melbourne.

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Breakfast at Customs House Hotel c/othewhiskeynut

When part of your itinerary  is tasting Tassie whisky – you need something substantial to set yourself up – and a good solid breakfast certainly starts the day off on the right path!

Oh to be back in Hobart.

Slainte.

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