Tag Archives: Blackford

Tullibardine Whisky Beer, 7%

Any whisky distillery that displays a row of beers proudly bearing it’s name always endears itself to me.

Tullibardine is one such distillery.

1488 Whisky Beer is a collaboration between Tullibardine Distillery – who provide the barrels – and Black Wolf Brewery – who make the beer.

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I do like a dark ale! c/othewhiskeynut

1488 is the year a young James IV ordered some beers from a local Tullibardine brewery.

This modern ale celebrates that long tradition of brewing & distilling in Tullibardine.

Alas there is no longer a brewery in the town – so nearby Black Wolf Brewery of Stirling do the honours.

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Let the wolf howl! c/othewhiskeynut

A dark brown ale colour & consistency.

A malty, bready nose.

Quite light on the palate with mild carbonation.

The whisky barrel ageing gives a heavier treacly undertow to the proceedings.

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Back story c/othewhiskeynut

An enjoyable pour that symbolises the rich history & craftship of brewing & distilling in the Central Belt of Scotland.

Sláinte

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Highland Queen, Blended Scotch, 40%

God Save The Queen!

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Highland Queen c/othewhiskeynut

Well – Highland Queen Scotch at least.

Earlier this month – in what now feels like a different era – I freely travelled by car, bus & plane across the Irish Sea to Scotland.

I also took the opportunity to visit a whisky distillery.

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Tullibardine Distillery c/othewhiskeynut

Tullibardine.

Owned by the French drinks company Picard Vins & Spiritueux – trading as Terroirs Distillers – Tullibardine – like many distilleries – has had a chequered history.

It also sails under the radar of many a more famous distillery – which piques my interest.

I found an open, honest, hard working distillery pumping out millions of litres of the amber nectar.

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A pair of Tullibardine stills. c/othewhiskeynut

Only around 30% of production is used by Tullibardine themselves. The vast majority – 70% – goes to supply the very backbone of the industry – blended Scotch.

Highland Queen is one such blend – available at the distillery too – which I was happy to try.

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Legal requirements. c/othewhiskeynut

A bit of caramel, a bit of vanilla, a bit of depth too. Very pleasant.

A nice smooth delivery opening up with decent rich flavours and an attractive bite as well.

A bit of alright!

Highland Queen is a characterful blend backed up by a long & distinguished career.

The constituent ingredients & blending ratios may constantly change – but the brand remains strong.

Just like how the whisky industry itself will comeback after the COVID19 pandemic.

Sláinte

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