Tag Archives: Dublin Airport

Pearse 5 Year Old Cask Strength 59.3% & Single Malt 46%

My recent travels through Dublin Airport happily coincided with the much heralded release of the Pearse 5 Year Old Cask Strength bottling.

It’s much heralded as it’s the first release from any of the new young bucks of Irish Whiskey Distilleries to hold such an age statement & to have been distilled by their own pot stills – even if in this case the pot stills were originally fired up in County Carlow before being moved into the marvelous surroundings of the magnificent Pearse Lyons Distillery in St James Church, Dublin.

That’s right – a church.

All praise be to whiskey.

The 12th Century church & graveyard was closed for worshipers in 1963 and subsequently fell into decay. It has been wonderfully & painstakingly restored by the Peasre Lyons Distillery team and you can read all about it here.

But back to the whiskey.

Despite being early in the morning – I accepted the sample proffered by the ambassador.

Oh!

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Pearse Cask Strength c/othewhiskeynut

A big hit of cask strength whiskey to blow the old cobwebs away!

Plenty of spirit in this one – but not much going on in the flavour department for me.

Definitely one to be watered down a touch.

Thankfully on my return there was a little package waiting for me.

Many thanks to all at Pearse Lyons for the pretty sample bottle of Pearse 5 Year Old Single Malt at 46%.

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Pearse 5 Year Old Single Malt c/othewhiskeynut

Suitably pale in colour – there is no added caramel nor chill filtering in this ex-bourbon cask matured whiskey.

The nose is light, citrusy & fresh. I’d go so far to say a hint of lemon in here.

Soft malty freshness continued in the taste department with a slight spiciness & long mellow finish bringing up the finish.

This isn’t a whiskey that slaps you around the cheeks on first tasting.  It’s a gentle, quieter introduction that smooths & caresses as it goes down.

You could say the subtlety and freshness is it’s strength.

Pity it’s a bit lost on me – I’m more a fan of big, bad & bold flavours.

If subtlety is your thing – there are only 1000 bottles of the Cask Strength & 4000 of the Single Malt out there. The Cask Strength is an Airport Exclusive – but happily the Single Malt is already available in the SuperValu chain of stores around the country.

Get them while you can.

Sláinte,

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Teeling Spirit Of Dublin Poitin, 52.5%

Flying?

We all do it these days.

For a whiskey fan like myself – the journey begins even before you’ve boarded the plane.

The last time I flew out of Dublin I took full advantage of the promotional stalls and tasted over half a dozen Irish whiskey samples – most of which I’d never tried before.

The one that stood out for me happened to be Teeling’s Spirit Of Dublin Poitin.

Why?

2 reasons.

1) This is the first spirit to be released from a new Dublin whiskey distillery for over a century.

That in itself makes this recently released poitin worthy of a punt – which is exactly what I did. But on tasting the spirit – I got a lovely surprise.

2) Spirit Of Dublin is a single pot still Poitin.

Once I worked my way through that initial oily, slightly rotten fruit smell of new make whiskey – I experienced a very welcome single pot still signature spice warming up my palate and making me smile.

Made with a mix of malted barley and unmalted barley – this is a uniquely Irish style originating from an early tax avoidance scheme where unmalted barely attracted no duty.

The unexpected result is a fabulous soft spice together with a slightly richer mouthfeel on tasting – which Spirit Of Dublin clearly possesses.

If it taste this good straight from the stills – what will it be like straight from the barrel after it’s matured for long enough to be called a whiskey?

Perhaps I’ll have to book another flight a few years hence to find out!

Slàinte.

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The Angel’s Share, Dublin Airport

Dropping the better half off at the airport the other week allowed me to explore the landside bar I knew existed but hadn’t actually visited.

As a musical accompaniment to the blog what else could I choose but…

Handily situated at the far end of the ground concourse below the Ryanair check-in desks – I was a little taken aback to see the name ‘The Angel’s Share‘ emblazoned above the wide entrance – together with a glass cabinet full of rare or hard to find Irish whiskeys.

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I wouldn’t mind trying a few of these… c/othewhiskeynut

For those that may not be aware – ‘the angel’s share’ is a whiskey term handily explained by reference to one of the bar walls inside this bright and airy establishment.

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Punters and prose c/othewhiskeynut

It’s also the title of an uplifting tragicomic movie by none other than Ken Loach which I’d wholeheartedly encourage you to see.

Now I know that the ‘piece de resistance’ in Dublin Airport is the magnificent Loop whiskey emporium on the airside duty free area – but for those not flying – or with a little time to spare – The Angel’s Share is a lovely spot to enjoy a glass of your favourite Irish Whiskey perhaps accompanied by a tasty meal or snack too.

Jameson’s fine Black Barrel release was ‘Whiskey Of The Month’ when I called – but as usual I was on the lookout for something I hadn’t had before. Sadly the rare cabinet whiskeys seemed to be  for display only as a member of staff couldn’t recall them ever being opened!

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Whiskey at The Angel’s Share c/othewhiskeynut

The Angel’s Share had a good selection of Midleton expressions – Jameson – Powers – Spots and Paddy  together with some Teeling and Hyde. Bourbons and Canadian Club also featured. What tickled my fancy however was a somewhat neglected Midleton release – Dunphys.

Dunphys Irish Whiskey was originally created in the 1950’s mainly for the American market. It became popular as a mixer – particularly in an Irish Coffee – but it’s star has now waned. Midleton’s sales force don’t seem to be pushing it either as many a pub I go into has a ‘Premium Whiskey Selection’ menu featuring only their own releases – in which I’ve yet to see Dunphys included.

Dunphys
Dunphys Irish Whiskey c/oThe Celtic Whiskey Shop

Truth be told I wasn’t expecting much being treated as the black sheep of the Midleton family – but Dunphys proved to be a fairly rich tasting malty standard blend. At the price point it’s sold at it compares very favourably indeed. I suppose it has an old fashioned taste – if you can define old fashioned. I certainly enjoyed it and even wondered why it had been left out in the cold – Irish Coffee anyone?

Discovering this little haven of calm in a busy airport left me with a smile on my face.

Other customers were tucking into hot meals – their first or last decent pint of the black stuff depending on travel plans – or just enjoying a wee dram collecting or dropping off friends and family. Just be careful not to relax too much if you are flying however!

Whatever the reason – The Angel’s Share will certainly brighten up my visits to the airport.

Sláinte

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