Tag Archives: IPA

What Price Whiskey Flavour? – 2 Dundalgans & a Teeling, Beer Barrel Aged Whiskey, 42% to 46%.

There’s been a sprinkling of articles questioning the price of whiskey.

Rant And Whisky, – Whisky And WisdomDairiesOfADramMerchant.

If cost is an issue – look around!

There are an increasing amount of attractively affordable alternatives available.

Lidl Ireland whiskey choices 2020 c/othewhiskeynut

The Dundalgan range from Lidl is one example.

Comprising of 5 bottles – none above €26 – displaying a broad array of styles & finishes, I’d suggest there’s something to suit all palates.

Having tried the entry level blend – & the entertaining IPA finished single malt – I grabbed the opportunity to sample more in a trio of beer barrel aged whiskey tasting.

Dundalgan IPA c/othewhiskeynut

Dundalgan IPA Cask Single Malt, 42%

A light, fruity & summery style of malt full of attractive flavours & a touch of character too.

Nice easy drinking.

Dundalgan Stout c/othewhiskeynut

Dundalgan Stout Cask Single Malt, 42%

A more solid, rich & heavy malt feel about this one. Very engaging – very moreish.

Lovely.

Teeling Stout c/othewhiskeynut

Teeling Galway Bay Stout Cask, Blend, 46%

The delightful bouquet of aromas from nosing were slightly diminished on drinking by the sweet grainy influence. A lighter offering with contrasting deeper notes & a prickly finish.

Very refreshing.

Thoughts

Overall – Dundalgan Stout Cask won the day.

Considering one Teeling costs around two Dundalgans – what price are you prepared to pay for flavour?

Sláinte

Dundalgan Irish Whiskey, Blend, 40%

The recently released diverse range from Dundalgan Whiskey have benefited from a fresh restyle – especially their standard blend.

Classic! c/othewhiskeynut

Sporting a classic red topped green bottle livery – the labelling proudly displays it’s West Cork Distillers origins & establishes an attractive uniformity to the series.

info c/othewhiskeynut

After being impressed by the IPA cask finished Dundalgan Single Malt – I thought I’d get back to basics with this ex-bourbon matured blend. Well – over 95% of Irish Whiskeys are blends – so says the Irish Whiskey 2010-2020 report.

Dundalgan in the Tuath c/othewhiskeynut

Golden brown in colour – a soft light honeyed nose greeted me.

Very easy on the palate – gentle vanillas & richer darker caramels gradually made their presence felt.

A frisson of tingly spice on the finish gave a lift to this elegantly simple sipper.

Punches beyond it’s pleasing price point!

Sláinte

Dundalgan Single Malt, IPA Edition, 42%

A few years ago I walked into a Scottish supermarket & noted the variety & depth of whisky choices far exceeded that provided in similar Irish stores.

Aldi Scotland whisky choices 2017 c/othewhiskeynut

Well not any longer!

Lidl have just released 5 different styles of whiskey under their own exclusive Dundalgan brand – made for them by West Cork Distillers.

Lidl Ireland whiskey choices 2020 c/othewhiskeynut

Comprising of a blend, charred cask blend & 3 single malts finished in Stout, IPA or Sherry casks – there’s a bottle to suit every palate!

Having recently enjoyed West Cork’s own Stout Cask – I thought I’d diversify into the Dundalgan IPA.

Dundalgan IPA & Tuath Glass c/othewhiskeynut

I wasn’t disappointed!

A fresh, light, bright & gently fruity note greeted me with a bit of depth.

Quite rich on the palate, the IPA cask brought some interesting & complex notes to this malt.

A touch of welcoming spice & gentle prickliness on the finish gave character to this engaging edition.

Back label info c/othewhiskeynut

Ironically I’m not an IPA fan when it comes to beer – I find them too bitter – but this Dundalgan whiskey works a treat!

Makes me want to try out the whole range!

Sláinte

Notorious Red IPA 5%

Bringing a whiskey to market is a long and arduous process fraught with setbacks & obstacles.

Getting planning permission for the distillery itself can be problematic – as the Sliabh Liag Distillery in Donegal have found out recently.

Sliabh Liag Distillery owner says Ardara move is necessary

Says Highland Radio here.

Hopefully they will have better luck in Ardara.

If you manage to build your distillery the next issue is warehouses to store the new make distillate for the required 3 years until it becomes whiskey. Great Northern Distillery are still on the hunt for storage after their plans were knocked back in County Louth.

Teeling looks outside Louth for €20m whiskey warehouse

Says Irish Times  here.

If you manage to overcome these hurdles – yet more await.

What are you going to call your whiskey?

A certain well known Dublin personality had hoped to call his whiskey ‘Notorious’ – but there happened to be a beer already on the market with that name.

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O’Hara’s Red IPA c/othewhiskeynut

What else could I do but pop down to my local O’Briens to purchase a few for tasting?

O’Hara’s are one of the original craft beer makers in Ireland. Founded in 1996 they were ahead of the pack and have grown with the times. Now a major player in the craft beer market they produce a varied range of porters, lagers, ales & IPA’s – as well as opening a bar in Kilkenny.

Their Notorious Red IPA is an amalgam of 2 popular styles of beer.

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Tasting Notorious c/othewhiskeynut

Red Ale is a relatively light ale usually showing a reddish hue. Notes of malt, soft caramel with a gentle smoke from the roasted malts often used coming through too.

IPA – or Indian Pale Ale to give the original definition – is the hot ticket in the craft beer world. The high hop content displays varying degrees of bitterness ranging from fresh citrussy summer notes to deeper almost woody pine flavours.

I must admit my palate is not a fan of IPA – the bitterness puts me off – but I do enjoy a Red Ale now and then.

So with that caveat in mind – how did I find the Notorious Red IPA?

A decent Red Ale ruined by the hoppy bitterness.

I did reach out to a self declared IPA fan – in the interests of balance – to get a view from the other side.

O’Hara’s Notorious, it’s a Knock Out!

Says Simon here.

Which I suppose it is.

Whiskey a no-go: McGregor suffers KO to brand plan

Says the Independent here.

Beer 1 – Whiskey 0.

Sláinte.

Good Logo

 

Jameson Caskmates, IPA Edition, 40%, Blend

You’ve gotta hand it to Irish Distillers – the largest producer of whiskey on the island of Ireland – for constantly coming up with new & innovative expressions for our delight & delectation.

The very successful Jameson Original blend is by far and away the biggest selling Irish whiskey in the world – but to be brutally honest – I find it rather bland & characterless.

The surprise hit of Jameson Caskmates Stout Edition gave the Original blend a welcome dose of character by it’s final maturation resting in casks that previously held stout from the Franciscan Well Brewery in Cork.

This has led to further collaboration with craft brewers around the world with limited releases of Jameson Caskmates in various regions to add more flavour & depth to the Original blend.

The latest incarnation of the Caskmates series takes it’s lead from the hirsute hipster’s darling drink of the craft beer scene – IPA.

You could say it’s bigger than Hip Hop!

IPA – or Indian Pale Ale to give it the original title – is a style of beer characterised by the varying degrees of bitterness provided by the inclusion of hops in the recipe. It currently fuels the growing interest in craft beer with an explosion of new tastes, new flavours & new styles.

DSCF3264 email
IPA Edition c/othewhiskeynut

Jameson has taken a leaf out of the craft beer scene to age their latest Caskmate in IPA casks – also from the nearby Franciscan Well Brewery – to provide new tastes, new flavours & new styles to the whiskey world.

So does it work?

Well – the back story and the flavours in the Stout Edition had me hooked so on hearing O’Briens had a limited run of 2000 for a trial period – I was first in line for a bottle!

20170905_181858 email
In O’Briens c/othewhiskeynut

But what does it taste like?

The dark colour struck me first – perhaps I was taking the IPA influence a bit too much in expecting a pale yellow offering!

On the nose it was relatively soft with a hint of citrus, quiet nice actually.

The taste came over crisp & dry. The bourbon maturation notes faded quickly to leave a pleasant dry lemony tart finish.

Novel & intriguingly enticing.

The overall experience was of a well balanced blend with subtle flavours throughout – perhaps just a bit too subtle for me.

But the hint of hops at the end together with a sprinkling of spice won me over.

You’d better ‘hop to it’ if yer after a bottle!

Sláinte.Good Logo

 

 

 

From Irish Beer Fest to Whiskey Fest

The Irish Craft Beer Fest of 27th to 29th August at the RDS in Dublin continues to be the centrepiece of the growing Irish Craft Beer scene. Brewers amaze with their ever expanding range of styles, flavours and tastes while new entrants pop up all over the country with yet more fine ales.

The atmosphere is always very relaxed and friendly with loads of seating areas where casual conversations with strangers quickly enter into the finer qualities of the beverage being consumed.

Cider is also a growing scene – with one of our party braving the massive 15% ABV Tawny from Stonewell Cider!

Brigid's Ale c/o thewhiskeynut
Brigid’s Ale c/o thewhiskeynut

Beers I sampled included the lovely White Hag Heather Sour Ale which managed to better their Bog Ale. Brigid’s Ale from Two Sisters was a lovely new entrant and Mountain Man had some lovely specials based on their Sneaky Owl brew.

Meanwhile the whiskey element seems to have been dropped from the logo – despite this 4 worthy distilleries displayed their wares at the show.

Jameson Caskmates c/o Jameson
Jameson Caskmates c/o Jameson

Midleton actually had 2 stalls. The first showcased their collaboration with Franciscan Wells Brewery of Cork and Jameson Whiskey using beer barrels to age whiskey in – and whiskey barrels to age beer in. Now I’ve tried a few beers of this type – Ola Dubh from Harvieston is one of the best –  and found them generally agreeable – rising to fabulous – but I’ve yet to try the whiskey!

The second Midleton stall was the marvelously wooded Single Pot Still stand offering the highly acclaimed as well as highly enjoyable range of expressions from this esteemed distillery.

The remaining stalls were both from the new kids on the block – no – not the dodgy boyband – but the new generation of Irish distillers.

Dingle Distillery of Kerry were showcasing their Gin and Vodka expressions only which judging by the long queues were going down very well indeed. Their whiskey however has not matured for long enough to be released yet – but should be out by the end of the year.

St Patrick's Distillery c/o thewhiskeynut
St Patrick’s Distillery c/o thewhiskeynut

The last spirit offering came from Cork in the shape of the unknown – at least to me – St Patrick’s Distillery. Despite telling myself I’d stick to sampling the myriad of beers on offer – I was drawn to this new expression – one of very few new releases not connected to the established distilleries.

I got talking to Cyril Walsh about their whiskey release – St Patrick’s Irish Whiskey. Turns out their spirit is a blend made from 3 year old grain from the West Cork Distillery in Skibbereen and a 21 year old malt from an undisclosed source – probably Midleton – also in Cork. The distillation, maturing, blending and bottling is all done in the Rebel County. St Patrick’s Distillery aren’t a distillery at all – they just get someone else to make it for them – then market it.

Now before anyone jumps on their high horse – this is a very tried and tested method of whiskey production. After all Mitchell & Son Wine Merchants bonded, blended and sold whiskey under their own brand names – Green Spot and Yellow Spot to name two – which originated from the then Jameson Distillery in Dublin.

St Patrick's Irish Whiskey c/o StPats
St Patrick’s Irish Whiskey c/o StPats

Having said that – St Patrick’s Irish Whiskey is not in the Spot class – it is however a very smooth spicy tasting blend which I enjoyed very much. There is a passing resemblance to some Powers releases in my mind – I’d certainly like to try the 21 year old malt that gives this blend it’s lovely flavour! They weren’t selling bottles at the show – a pity as I’d have snapped one up on the strength of the sample I drank.

Powers Johns Lane Release c/o irishwhiskey.com
Powers Johns Lane Release c/o irishwhiskey.com

After having this lovely tipple – despite being at the beer fest – our table started a whiskey fest and an excellent Yellow Spot arrived. This is a smoother 12 year old companion to the equally fine Green Spot. Not to be outdone I offered the Powers John’s Lane Release which also has a rich smoothness complimented by a spiciness which gives it just that extra little kick I love – despite The Cramps who are still looking for it.

As time was getting on – we retired to a friends house where the fine whiskeys kept on coming courtesy of the drinks cabinet.

There was a predominance of Scotch whisky on offer with a few Irish expressions too.

The first off the blocks caused a rumpus. Now I know Speyside malts have an almost cult like status in the whisky world – much like IPA has amongst the craft beer fraternity – and Gordon & McPhail are renowned blenders and bottlers of good repute who have been tantalising the tastebuds of whisky aficionados for over 120 years – but their Speymalt Macallan much like Shania says – didn’t impress me much!

Speymalt Macallan c/o mastersofmalt
Speymalt Macallan c/o mastersofmalt

There you go – said it – I’ve completely dismissed the holy trinity of alcoholic beverages – Scotch whisky – specifically from Speyside – Gordon & McPhail and IPA – the beer style that launched the current craft beer revival – dissed by a slice of cheesy 90’s pop!

But isn’t drinking all about personal taste? Not about what we are told to like by popularity polls or slick advertising?

Springbank 10yo c/o Springbank
Springbank 10yo c/o Springbank

After my host almost choked on his dram – a bottle of Springbank 10 yo proved to be far more aligned with my tastes. I have to admit here that I have had issues with peat in the past – but this finely balanced expression allows other flavours to come through in the mouth whilst the peat element gives an extra oomph to the experience.

Jack Ryan 12yo c/o Jack Ryan
Jack Ryan 12yo c/o Jack Ryan

The Irish contingent were not to be outdone with a very fine smooth glass of the excellent Jack Ryan 12 yo Single followed by an equally smooth Celtic Casks Ocht release which is one of the expressions made in conjunction with the Celtic Whiskey Shop. I did prefer their Knappogue Castle Marsala release – but I think it’s all sold out now!

Knappogue Castle Marsala Cask c/o Celticwhiskeyshop
Knappogue Castle Marsala Cask c/o Celticwhiskeyshop

The final offering also split the table. Whilst the host waxed lyrical about how cask strength is a pure form of the distillers art undiluted by ingredients like water – others mused it blew your head off and as mere drinkers we had to guess how much water to add – too much killed the taste – too little numbed the palate – we felt safer if the expert distiller had done this for us.

Glengoyne Cask Strength c/o Glengoyne
Glengoyne Cask Strength c/o GlengoyneJa

At a massive 58% ABV the Glengoyne Cask Strength hits the palate with a BOOM – but within that there were discernible tastes and flavours. Mmmmm! Must explore this distillery further.

By now the discussions became more rambling and mellow! Teas, coffees and a slice of toast rounded of the very enjoyable evening tasting.

From the premier Irish Beer Fest to a very fine private whiskey fest – what more could you ask for?

Slainte

Whiskey Nut