Tag Archives: Irish Whiskey Awards

Paddy’s Share Irish Whiskey, Blend, 47%

Being a judge in the blind whiskey tastings for the Irish Whiskey Awards 2021 did reveal a few surprises.

One of them was an entrant named Paddy’s Share in the Blended Limited Release category.

Photo Courtesy Celtic Whiskey Shop

I gave it an above average score with brief tasting notes of

very soft smoke, soft palate, drying finish, pale colour’.

Searching the internet failed to uncover what Paddy’s Share was – until now!

Sazerac -Paddy brand owners – have just unveiled Paddy’s Share to the public.

A sherry finished triple distilled blend presented at 47% offering bold & nutty flavours.

Blind Whiskey Judging courtesy Whiskey Nut

Paddy’s Share is a welcome addition to the long established brand & one that stood out for me in the blind tasting.

Looking forward to enjoying more of Paddy’s Share!

Sláinte

The Brollach, Single Malt, 46.45%

There was a highly unexpected & very pleasant surprise entry into the Irish Whiskey Awards 2021.

The Brollach.

Tasted blind in the Cask Strength category The Brollach scored well on my palate.

It shared joint 2nd – along with 2 other offerings.

Perhaps it’s 46.45% presentation gave it an advantage over higher strength whiskey where I often find the flavours blown away.

As it is the only thing that blew me away was the price – €5,500!

Sláinte

All images courtesy Craft Irish Whiskey Co

Plain Packaging, Branding & Celebrity Spirits

For health reasons Plain Packaging is now enforced for tobacco products in Ireland & it could well follow for alcohol.

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A recent report highlighted the issues involved – from the brands position – but It did set me wondering.

I drink whiskey to enjoy the taste.

Fancy packaging, back stories & celebrity endorsements may enhance the experience – but the liquid inside the bottle & how my palate perceives it is paramount.

As I’m currently judging this years Irish Whiskey Awards I note all the samples come in plain packaging – albeit without the health warnings.

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This is to strip out any bias – conscious or unconscious – towards particular brands or distilleries & lets the whiskey speak for itself.

Branding clearly works. It’s why companies spend vast amounts of money establishing a ‘relationship’ with the customer.

Celebrity endorsements are an extension of that process & are part of the cultural fabric today.

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From Conor McGregor to Graeme McDowell – note the different reception shown to both – George Clooney to Rita Ora – celebrities boost sales.

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Whiskey bloggers also court celebrity status promoting merchandise & image over and above actual content.

Love it or loath it – branding abounds.

Whether your whiskey comes in Plain Packaging or not, is promoted by a superstar or just recommended by a popular blogger or not, rest assured the whiskey flavour remains the same.

How your palate experiences & interprets that flavour is unique to you.

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Pour yourself a measure & let the whiskey do the talking.

Sláinte

Hyde Whiskey Selection x 6, Blends, Single Grain & Single Malt, 46%.

I’ve got to hand it to Hyde Whiskey.

Despite the early controversy over labelling – their whiskey has always rated highly with me winning 2 blind tasting categories in the 2017 Irish Whiskey Awards judging sessions I attended.

Perhaps it’s #allaboutthewood – as their slogan goes.

Or could it be the non chill filtration & no added caramel?

The ‘no added caramel’ isn’t actually stated on the labels – but a perusal of whisky.de – where it’s a requirement to say if caramel is added- reveals none.

Whatever the reasons – my palate enjoys Hyde Whiskey & an opportunity to sample 6 of their current range is a delight.

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Many thanks to Hyde Whiskey for providing the samples. My thoughts – as always – are my own.

Rather than going by release numbers or dates – all Hyde Whiskey carry significant years in Douglas Hyde’s history as well as release numbers – I’m following perceived wisdom in tasting Blends, Single Grain & Single Malt.

All are presented at a pleasing 46%.

Blends

1938 c/othewhiskeynut

No 6, 1938, President’s Reserve, Sherry Cask Finish

Honeyed vanilla, smooth & easy, clean finish with lovely prickliness.

Having given this top rating in the 2017 blind judging it was great to encounter this one again. It didn’t disappoint.

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No 8, 1640, Heritage Cask, Stout Cask Finish

Crisp & clean, lovely mouth coating, flavours develop on a long finish.

A recent newcomer to the range entering the exciting beer cask finished craze. I found it a very engaging offering.

Single Grain

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No 3, 1916, The Áras Cask, Single Grain

Rich vanillas, lightness yet full on flavour, classic ex-bourbon cask notes.

I’ve always found this one an attractive whiskey. Love the simplicity & cleanliness of the ex-bourbon maturation which 1916 has in spades.

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No 5, 1860, The Áras Cask, Burgundy Cask Finish

Dark fruits, easy sweet mellowness, almost like fruit pastels on the finish.

I do find wine finished whiskey a tad too sweet for my palate – but they’re a winner for others. This is a good example.

Single Malt

1893 c/othewhiskeynut

No 7, 1893, President’s Cask, Sherry Cask Matured

Rich sweet fruitiness, silky mouthfeel, notes of sweet plums.

Originally released as a 10 year old, now non age statemented, the sweet tooth flavours still come through very well.

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No 4, 1922, President’s Cask, Rum Cask Finish

Dark fruitiness, heavier appeal, rich juiciness, touch of spice.

Despite being sweet, the rum finish added depth & body which suited my palate. Very nice!

Thoughts

Trying to choose a favourite among this excellent selection is really down to personal preference with such fine whiskeys.

To narrow it down my winners for each category were;

1938 for the blends,

1916 for single grain &

1922 for single malt.

These whiskey are all winners in my book – but for overall appeal, lovely engaging flavours & attractive bite on the finish – I’m giving top spot to 1938!

What is your preference?

Sláinte

Three Ships 15 Year Old Pinotage Cask, Blend, 46.2%

I’d heard a lot about the James Sedgwick Distillery in South Africa – mainly positive – so I couldn’t let this opportunity pass.

A glass of Three Ships 15yo was duly ordered in a packed Dick Mac’s pub at Dingle after the fabulous Irish Whiskey Awards 2019 event.

I got chatting with some American tourists – as you do – and they asked a pertinent question.

‘If you’ve heard a lot of good news regarding a whiskey – does that raise your expectations?’

‘Certainly’ I replied ‘But the proof is in the drinking.’

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I saw Three Ships & took a glass. c/othewhiskeynut

So I gave Three Ships a good nosing – and beamed a broad smile.

There was a richness & depth to this whisky that captivated me.

Notes of dark cherries – a juicy fruitiness – the warmth from years in wood and a touch of oaky spice. It reminded me of a good port finish – yet this was a South African Pinotage Wine cask. Works for my palate!

Those dark –  almost heavy notes – followed through into the taste. My mouth burst with flavours before a pleasing punchy alcohol kick set them alight.

The finish had those flavours gently falling back into orbit with a gorgeous warm oaky spice tinged with prickly juiciness.

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Three Ships aft label c/othewhiskeynut

I was so impressed I insisted my American friends took a swig.

They likened the punchy quality to a good rye – no bad thing in my book – although the luscious fruit juiciness of Three Ships was in contradiction to the dry peppery spice of a rye.

Even after tasting the Irish Whiskey Awards winners – this Three Ships 15yo certainly won me over!

Sláinte

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Many thanks to the kindly American tourists for sharing their time & displaying the whisky for my snaps. Hope you had a great time in Ireland.

 

Porterhouse Celebration Stout, 4th Barrel Aged Release, 12%

An unexpected serve at Dingle Distillery for the Irish Whiskey Awards 2019 event was this Celebration Stout from Porterhouse Brewery.

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It’s dark and it’s heavy. c/othewhiskeynut

I say unexpected as I’d not come across this one before – and obviously missed the previous 3 offerings.

Rich & dark, the sweet malty notes on the nose from the ex bourbon barrels used to mature this beer pulled me in.

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Drinking beer in the distillery. c/othewhiskeynut

The palate had a dark fruitiness to it – ex port casks (a favourite of Dingle Whiskey) contributed to this element – and the carbonation being light suited my tastes.

Full bodied & bursting with flavour this isn’t a shy stout – I certainly warmed to it’s delights.

Clearly the judges thought so too – as Celebration Stout went on to win the Best Irish Whiskey Barrel Aged Beer category .

A worthy winner!

Sláinte

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JJ Corry, The Flintlock, 16 Year Old Single Malt, 46%

The first thing you notice about the new Flintlock release from the award winning Chapel Gate Whiskey is the pale complexion of the 16 year old single malt.

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Come on in to Chapel Gate Irish Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

No added colouring here.

The next thing you notice is the rich aroma of vanilla even as you pour the sample into a Túath Glass.

No chill filtering either.

It’s silky smooth in the mouth.

Yet more rich vanilla & light caramel from the bourbon cask maturation.

Some fresh lemony citrus notes.

It softly grows into a gorgeously gentle spiciness which dances off the tongue.

A lovely warming finish rounds up this award winning single malt.

Sláinte.

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A sample was taken at the Irish Whiskey Awards held in Slane Castle on 18th October 2018 and tasted at home.

Limited release – contact Celtic Whiskey Shop to reserve a bottle.

Kilbeggan Small Batch Rye, 43%

I got fierce excited at last years Whiskey Live Dublin over the opportunity to sample an Irish rye whiskey that was still maturing in Kilbeggan Distillery.

The bottle was filled straight from the cask at over 60% ABV & presented non chill filtered without added caramel.

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When will this stunner be released? c/othewhiskeynut

It was powerful – yet the mashbill of malted & unmalted barley together with a high rye content displayed that wonderful peppery rye spiciness with a smooth & creamy barley influence.

Almost a year on the production bottle has been released in time for Whiskey Live Dublin 2018 – as well as picking up a Gold Medal at the recently held Irish Whiskey Awards.

As a self confessed rye fan I picked up a bottle in the distillery on my return from the highly enjoyable awards evening at Slane Castle.

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Small Batch Rye calling card c/othewhiskeynut

Now the bottle design is rather muted & understated. There are some lovely tasting notes on the back label – an unexplained handshake logo on the neck – and a nod to the historical inclusion of rye in Irish whiskey making from times past.

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The back label c/othewhiskeynut

I fully welcome the return of rye to the modern Irish whiskey scene.

On the nose it’s very soft, slightly sweet with just a hint of peppery spice that signifies the rye content.

The palate is also very silky & smooth. The barley content dominates the initial experience before that black pepper spiciness – which I love – kicks in to leave a wonderfully drying mouthfeel at the end which slowly fades away.

At 43% & with added caramel – which is found throughout the Kilbeggan range of whiskeys – I couldn’t help feeling some of the spark & vitality of that original cask sample had been lost a little in this more tame offering.

I just had to compare it with the Arbikie Highland Rye released late 2017 in Scotland.

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Ireland v Scotland Rye test c/othewhiskeynut

Now this is also a barley/rye mix – but there’s no unmalted barley – and the rye content is higher at 52%. It’s also younger at only 2 years old & has no added caramel or chill filtering. It’s bottled at 46%.

There is more pronounced rye on the nose.

The smoothness & creaminess of the barley belies it’s young age before a joyfully massively drying peppery spice explodes on the palate leaving a fabulously prickly finish.

I’m afraid to say – when it comes to rye – Scotland do it better.

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My Top 3 Whiskey Events of 2016

Looking back on 2016 with my whiskey glasses on has been a wonderful journey.

Events without the glasses on leave a lot to be desired.

It marked my 1st full calendar year – Jan to Dec – of the blog along with a growing audience, new friends, new events and above all – some lovely whiskey.

Picking out a few highlights from the many is no easy task. I’ve distilled it down to 3 events that were not only enjoyable at the time but I think will have an impact in the following year.

1 The launch of Galway Bay Irish Whiskey

A collaborative team from the 11 venues of The Galway Whiskey Trail selected this Gold Medal winning 10 year old single malt made at West Cork Distillers to be sold on the trail. I thoroughly enjoyed my day on the trail during an otherwise dull January day.

The launch night itself in May aboard the Aran Islands ferry on the stunning Galway Bay with wonderful company & beautiful scenery certainly deserves a Whiskey Nut Award for the best new whiskey launch of the year!

I’m definitely looking forward to a growing list of whiskey trails around Ireland. Especially as the Irish Whiskey Association aims to be a world leader in whiskey tourism.

And perhaps some new whiskeys specific to each trail?

2 The rebirth of rye in Irish Whiskey

Brian Nation’s speech at the Irish Whiskey Awards in Tullamore highlighted innovation within the industry.

I had tears of joy when he mentioned Irish Distillers are currently growing 140ha of rye near Enniscorthy for potential use in recreating old John Jameson recipes uncovered by the archive department that included rye in the mix.

Later in the evening some whiskey friends from America were sharing a bottle of Emerald American Whiskey.

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The Emerald c/othewhiskeynut

Well I say American Whiskey as that’s where it was produced and matured.

But the recipe is based on an 1865 Irish Whiskey recorded for posterity by a British excise agent and includes both malted and unmalted barley along with some oats & rye.

It tasted divine.

Not long after that I came across Prize Fight Irish Whiskey at Whiskey Live Dublin.

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Prize Fight Irish Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

Another West Cork Distillers produced whiskey that has been finished in ex-rye barrels from Tamworth Distilling in New Hampshire.

I was pleasantly surprised by how much of the dry mouthfeel and rich spicy punch associated with a rye whiskey came through in this delightful blend. Wonderful!

To top it off Fionnan O’Connor wrote an excellent piece in the inaugural Irish Whiskey Magazine which delved in to the history of mash bills commonly used in Irish whisky production in the 1800’s and what do you know? Rye featured quite a bit to the extent that a certain Andrew Jameson went to the trouble of importing the grain as Irish sources were hard to come by .

My mouth is already watering in anticipation of future Irish rye releases.

3 My trip to Tas

My Australian adventure was ostensibly for a wedding but I used it to sample & taste as much Aussie whisky as I could come across on my travels.

The variety of styles, tastes & flavours had me enthralled.

Tasmania was undoubtedly the jewel in the crown. It’s home to a growing number of whiskey distilleries including Lark, Overeem, Hellyers Road and the wonderful Belgrove Distillery which produces some astounding rye whisky – well – what else would you expect? – combined with fabulous scenery, wildlife & fine dining.

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Bruny Island Tasmania c/othewhiskeynut

The trend of countries not normally associated with whiskey production will continue as witnessed by Italy’s highly praised Puni Whisky.

My future holiday plans will always try and seek out new and exciting whiskey in whatever destination I end up in.

So what would be your whiskey highlights of 2016?

Drop me a line or post on my facebook or twitter accounts.

Many thanks for reading and a shout out to all those I’ve met along the way.

Happy dramming for 2017!

Slainte.

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Jameson’s Whiskey Makers Series At Midleton Distillery

Despite there being another judging session for the upcoming Irish Whiskey Awards going on in Dublin, it had been decided a trip down south to visit friends for the weekend was in order.

Accepting the revised schedule I checked out what was on.

My luck was in!

The Midleton Food & Drink Festival just happened to be on celebrating the rich diversity of food & drink grown or made in the East Cork region. Midleton Distillery plays a large role in this festival and fortuitously had two events which I cold attend.

The Art Of Making Barrels by none other than Master Cooper Ger Buckley was being held in the Old Distillery whilst David McCabe – Head of Jameson’s Irish Whiskey Academy – was introducing 3 new super premium Jameson whiskeys as part of a talk & taste session.

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Jameson Makers Series c/othewwhiskeynut

I couldn’t let this opportunity pass and duly booked tickets for myself.

The drive down the M8 heightened our enjoyment as the sun shone down on the fields and stunning mountains of the Galtys to our right and the Knockmealdowns on the left on whose lower slopes the Tipperary Boutique Distillery farm gathers the water for their lovely Watershed and Knockmealdown releases.

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Knockmealdowns c/othewhiskeynut

Arriving at our destination we caught up with our friends and chatted over tea & biscuits. Forgetting all about time in the convivial company I left it too late to make Ger’s cooperage display. Chastising myself I endeavoured to make it in time for David McCabe’s talk.

The Old Midleton Distillery was originally built in 1825 on the banks of the Dungourney River and produced whiskey in the heart of Midleton up to the mid 1970’s when the New Midleton Distillery was built behind the original site to produce all the brands of the combined Irish Distillers Group – Powers, Jameson and Paddy being the most popular. The old site now houses the visitors centre where tours, tastings, dining and shopping for whiskey fans from all around the world flock to enjoy the delights within.

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Welcome to Midleton! c/othewhiskeynut

Arriving early I had a little time to wander around and explore before the talk. I was pleased to see you can bottle your own cask strength black barrel whiskey on site. I always like a distillery exclusive!

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Fill yer own whiskey! c/othewhiskeynut

Ushered into a former warehouse, now a plush auditorium. David McCabe introduced himself  and eloquently guided us through an informative history of both Midleton Distillery as well as the art of making whiskey. I picked up a few whiskey facts I’d not known off before.

Did you know Midleton only uses non-GM (genetically modified) barley and maize for it’s mash bill?

Did you know all the barley – both malted and unmalted – is grown locally?

Did you know the maize element for the grain spirit is grown in France?

I didn’t – but was pleased to hear of the non-GM stance even if I couldn’t taste the difference. As for the french maize – it seems there is just not enough sunshine in Ireland to grow maize of suitable quality for whiskey making.

David then introduced us to the 3 new premium Makers Series blended whiskeys. Each expression was chosen to highlight a particular attribute integral to the art of making whiskey.

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A glass of the good stuff! c/othewhiskeynut

Distiller’s Safe is the locked copper and glass construction where Head Distiller Brian Nation decides which cut of the raw spirit straight from the still will be used in the final blend. A combination of single pot still whiskey with light grain whiskey matured in ex-bourbon barrels gives a fairly delicate nose followed through by vanilla taste combined with a little spice from the single pot still element.

Blender’s Dog is a tool used by Head Distiller Billy Leighton to sample the spirit as it matures. This is a relatively young blend of single pot still whiskey with a soft light grain whiskey to highlight the complex art of blending.

Cooper’s Croze is a tool Head Cooper Ger Buckley uses to cut a groove in barrel for the ‘head’ to sit in. The blend celebrates the use of wood in maturation and uses 1st and 2nd fill ex-bourbon barrels as well as virgin oak and sherry barrels in a satisfying complex blend.

All of the whiskeys I found quiet light & delicate. Not really my taste preference. However they are a step up from the standard Jameson Original though and are probably exactly what Jameson intends them to be.

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Jameson Original c/othewhiskeynut

Offered at 43% ABV and non-chill filtered for the flat price of 70 euro each, the Makers Series would be a lovely collection of the different influences of the distillate, the wood and the blend in each expression.

Meanwhile my tastes would take me to the unblended single pot still offerings of Green Spot or John’s Lane Release which offer much more bolder and spicier flavours at roughly the same price level. I did also wonder if the Makers Series was entered into my judging panel of the previous week which I didn’t rate too highly?

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Tasty Single Pot Still Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

Ah well,

David McCabe did a super premium talk to introduce the Makers Series.

The narrative behind all 3 expressions is also super premium down to the fingerprints on the label.

It’s just a pity my individual palate didn’t appreciate the actual premium whiskey .

Maybe your palate will.

Let me know either way.

Slainte

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