Tag Archives: Mullingar

Jack Daniels Single Barrel, 45%

Jack Daniels.

It doesn’t really need an introduction.

DSCF7375 email
Jack c/othewhiskeynut

The iconic biggest selling whiskey brand in America has plenty of fans.

I wouldn’t be one of them.

The caramel forward nose, rather robust mouth feel with mere hints of wood & spice, leaves me nonplussed.

After one – I wouldn’t be tempted for more.

But moving up the range a little does find me something I have gone back to on a number of occasions.

Jack Daniels Single Barrel is an altogether far more enjoyable experience.

IMG_0610 email
A big whiskey in a small bottle. c/othewhiskeynut

The caramel isn’t the only note in town.

There’s vanilla, wood and an engaging spiciness.

The robust character is still there – but at 45% it delivers a far more extensive array of flavours that dance off the palate. Cinnamon & nutmeg combine with sweet vanilla & oakiness.

These gently fade away leaving that wonderful dry mouth feel I enjoy.

So when I spotted this attractive miniature in The Old Stand recently – I was tempted for more.

And I’m glad I did.

Slàinte.

Good Logo

 

 

Locke’s Irish Whiskey, Blend, 40%

This delightfully enjoyable blend almost passed me by.

IMG_0594 email
Locke’s Irish Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

Released under John Teeling’s tenure at Kilbeggan Distillery – it now seems to have slipped from the current line up of new owners Beam/Suntory.

For the greater part of it’s history the distillery at Kilbeggan went by various names. Originally called Brusna Distillery in 1757 – after the river the waterwheel still turns from to this day – then Locke’s Distillery – after the Locke family who effectively ran the operation from 1843 until closure in 1958.

DSCF9825 email
Brusna, Locke’s, Kilbeggan entrance c/othewhiskeynut

The distillery licence never expired during the following years. In turn this was acquired by John Teeling’s Cooley Distillery which opened in 1987 and resurrected the Locke’s brand – along with a few others.

Locke’s Distillery only ever produced pot still whiskey – which is perhaps one of many reasons for it’s demise – so ironically this miniature is a blended whiskey – using both grain & malt whiskeys combined together.

The Irish Whiskey Industry were rather late in embracing blended whiskey – over 130 years later than their Scottish counterparts – which also partly explains it’s collapse by the 1960’s.

So in it’s own way – Locke’s Blended Irish Whiskey was part of the revival. I’m glad to have stumbled on this miniature at The Old Stand in Mullingar.

IMG_0600 email
Locke’s in a Túath Glass c/othewhiskeynut

The colour is light straw – but added caramel cannot be ruled out for this entry level blend.

A lovely soft malt greeted me on nosing. Sweet with just a little hint of turf.

The palate was soft, sweet & very smooth. Eminently approachable. Yet there is a slight suggestion of peat at the end to give it a bit of bite & character.

A decent afterglow wrapped up this extremely enjoyable drinking experience.

Well worth getting hold of if you come across a bottle.

Liquid history.

Sláinte.

Good Logo

Millars Special Reserve, 40%, Blend

I enjoy entering premises I’ve not been in before.

You never know what you will find.

I certainly found some gems in The Old Stand off licence in Mullingar recently.

IMG_0571 email
The Old Stand off licence & bar Mullingar. c/othewhiskeynut

This miniature of Millars Special Reserve is increasing hard to find. So I promptly bought it, opened it and drank it.

IMG_0591 email
Millars Irish Whiskey in a Túath glass. c/othewhiskeynut

Light pale straw in colour – it has that caramelly nose with a bit of a spirity kick.

I found the taste satisfyingly warm & smooth, A good hint of vanilla with a lovely gentle heat on the finish.

An easy sipping blend indeed.

Good Logo

Westmeath Irish Whiskey, Blend, 40%

If you’re looking for some novelty whiskey then the Celtic Whiskey Shop is the place to go.

They have a range of miniature bottles labelled up in county colours covering the entire Island of Ireland.

Meanwhile, I happened to be in Mullingar recently & picked up their Westmeath Irish Whiskey in the surprisingly well stocked off-licence of The Old Stand on Dominick Street – just round the corner from the railway station.

Not being one to leave a bottle unopened – I poured a glass.

IMG_0580 email
Westmeath Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

There is no indication as to the source of the whiskey. Kilbeggan Distillery does produce malt in the county of Westmeath – mainly for inclusion in blends – but it didn’t strike me as one of theirs -although this young lad is definitely from Mullingar.

The colour was reassuringly straw like – even if added caramel is predominant in entry level blends.

The nose was rather spirity at first – but calmed down on subsequent tastings to reveal some standard vanilla & caramel notes.

A mild tasting with subtle fruits & more of that bourbon cask influence made it’s presence felt after a rather alcohol forward mouthfeel.

There was a bit of a burn at the end – but nothing too unpleasant. Just a straight forward no-nonsense entry level whiskey.

More novelty than nuanced.

Good Logo

My thanks to TOMODERA for posting his thoughts on other county whiskeys here.