Tag Archives: Rye

JG Kinsey, Special Reserve, Blended Scotch, 40%

Wow!

This one gives a lot!

I picked up this bargain basement blend working my way through all the whiskeys available in my local Dunnes Stores.

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JG Kinsey founded 1892 c/othewhiskeynut

JG Kinsey also comes with gin & vodka options & I had it down as a store brand.

WRONG!

Jacob G Kinsey was an american gentleman who founded the Linfield Distillery in 1892. Pennsylvania was – and still is – associated with rye whiskey. A successful business flourished, floundered, merged & was subsumed into the giant International Beverage Holdings Group.

Kinsey’s name lives on with this current offering – plus numerous blogs & posts about the now abandoned plant at Linfield.

Linfield
Linfield Distillery c/opre-pro.com

Interestingly New Liberty Distillery in Philadelphia – who have a connection with Connacht Whiskey in Ballina – also name check Kinsey with a range of Bourbon, Rye & American Whiskey.

With all this proud heritage – would the liquid inside the bottle deliver?

Well the nose had that sweetly honeyed, richly caramelised aroma – with a touch of depth.

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Some pedigree c/othewhiskeynut

As the label states – it was definitely smooth – but the body displayed a lovely wholesomeness which flourished on the finish into a gorgeously drying spiciness.

The source of this depth no doubt comes from the more meaty style of malts produced at the Balmenach, Balblair & Speyburn distilleries of the InterBev Group.

They give the blend a more robust kind of ‘Highland’ appeal – which suits my palate.

A bargain basement beauty!

Sláinte

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DOT 12, Barrel Aged Imperial Rye, 9%

The Irish Craft Beer scene continues to grow.

Partly by innovation, collaboration & the exploration of new tastes & styles.

This latest barrel aged beer does all three.

It uses rye – a relatively unexplored grain for Irish Beer – as well as Irish Whiskey.

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Collaboration c/othewhiskeynut

It’s also a collaboration by 12 Acres of Co Laois and DOT Brew in Dublin, who give this  grain a further twist – by ageing it in Irish Whiskey barrels – as well as other finishes.

I got a pleasantly sweet orange note on the nose – which complemented the beer’s attractive colour.

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Lovely! c/othewhiskeynut

The carbonation was relatively light – & suited me fine.

Rather than the dry signature spice I expect from rye whiskey – a wonderfully rich combination of earthy rye, biscuity malt & a fresh fruity element greeted me on tasting.

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Nice! c/othewhiskeynut

At 9% – this is no shrinking violet.

Heavy in flavour – but light on the palate.

Very entertaining.

Sláinte

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Riviére Saint-Jean, Rhum Vieux, 6 Ans,40%

Ooh la la!

I gotta hand it to Lidl for expanding my spirit drinking range.

This bottle of rum from Réunion – hence the French connection – emanates  from the Indian Ocean via a Parisienne suburb.

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Fantastique! c/othewhiskeynut

There is no Riviére Saint-Jean distillery on the island – but a Riviére du Mat distillery founded in 1886 – appears to be the source of this offering.

There’s also a ‘Saga du Rhum‘ museum on Réunion to further explore the rich history of distillation – including the sorry tale of sugar, slavery and colonial exploitation. Hopefully those days are long gone. Meanwhile – the rum is still here to enjoy.

A deep ruby brown colour greets you – followed by an attractive oaky tannic nose on a dark molassey underbelly.

The palate was quite delicious.

The smooth warming sweetness morphed into a gorgeously drying spicy explosion. Very reminiscent of some rye whiskeys I enjoy.

Not had a rum like this before!

I’m feeling Riviére Saint-Jean accentuates the cask influence with it’s 6 years in wood.

C’est bon – c’est trés bon.

Santé

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Glastry Farm Kilbeggan Irish Whiskey Ice Cream, 3.32%

A visit to a whiskey distillery is always an exciting experience.

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Kilbeggan on a wet day c/othewhiskeynut

There is the history, the heritage, the gleaming copper pot stills, the subtle smells of malted barley along with gentle woody notes of maturing casks.

There are the characters that make the whiskey too – and all that before actually tasting the whiskey!

But there is also the unexpected.

Like Glastry Farm Kilbeggan Irish Whiskey infused ice cream!

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Mmmmmm! Nice c/othewhiskeynut

I couldn’t resist.

Soft, creamy, indulgent, with a mention of malt in the background. This ice cream makes a gorgeous dessert on it’s own – let alone served with strawberries and a dash of Kilbeggan Small Batch Rye perhaps?

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Go on,dig in! c/othewhiskeynut

Little touches like this provide the icing on the cake.

It’s more than the whiskey.

It’s immersing yourself in the experience.

When will you visit Kilbeggan Distillery?

Slàinte

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Arbikie Highland Rye, Aged 3 Years, Single Grain Scotch Whisky, 46%

It’s not everyday you get a whisky sample sent through the post – especially one as outstanding as Highland Rye Single Grain Whisky from Arbikie Distillery in Arbroath, Scotland.

To begin with, this is a farm to bottle operation.

The grains used – barley, rye & wheat in this instance – are grown in the fields around the distillery.

There is also no chill filtration nor added colouring to mute the fabulous flavours within.

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Arbikie Highland Rye Whisky c/othewhiskeynut

And it’s a rye.

The first for many a year Scotland has produced.

Rye at one stage was a common grain used in a mixed mashbill distillation by both Scottish and Irish distillers as testified by a certain Mr Jameson at the 1909 ‘What is Whisky’ enquiry.

Rye mashbills
Quotes from 1909 enquiry c/oblackwaterdistilleryblog

It happens to be a grain I’m very attracted to.

It adds a bit of bite, a dash of dry peppery spice, a certain boldness, a touch of character and a degree of complexity to any whiskey.

Rye has no legal definition in either Scotland nor Ireland. Yet in America – often seen as the home of rye – it must have a mashbill content of at least 51% rye to gain the title – which this Highland Rye does.

So what’s it like to drink?

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Highland Rye in a Tuath Glass c/othewhiskeynut

Absolutely fabulous!

The nose captures the classic dry peppery spice augmented by elements of cherry sweetness from the PX cask finish.

The barley & wheat bring a silky smoothness to begin with, coating the palate in a warm snug of dark fruitiness before the rye makes itself known.

The palate gradually dries off into a wonderfully prickly peppery spice with hints of cherries dancing around on the enjoyably long finish.

The PX finish adds another layer of depth & complexity to this rye.

On a back to back tasting with its  2 year old sibling – which I purchased on first hearing Scotland had produced a rye – the youthful exuberance & freshness resulted in a cleaner, more classic peppery spice experience balanced with a barley smoothness.

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Rye Spirit vs Rye Whisky c/othewhiskeynut

The PX finish of the 3 year old  – which is still a relatively unusual style of rye even in America – boosts that joyful youthfulness with richer, darker elements.

Arbroath – more famous for stovies & smokies – can now add rye to the culinary & quaffable delights on offer.

My thanks to all at Arbikie for the opportunity to taste this gorgeous rye whisky.

Sláinte

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The Charles House, Blend, 40%

The joy of whisky can come from unexpected and surprising places.

Like France.

When on holiday there I had a clear set of purchasing procedures.

Number 1 on the list were some French made whiskies which I quickly ticked off at the lovely V&B chain of stores on my way out of Toulouse.

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Rye Francais c/othewhiskeynut

Roof Rye certainly raised my spirits here!

2nd on the list was any locally based Irish whiskey brands – but there weren’t any – as I found out in my recent blog here.

3rd on the list and last pickings were locally based Scotch brands – there were LOADS of them!

Have you ever wondered why only half of the 130 or so Scottish Whisky Distilleries have visitors centres?

The others are so busy pumping out liquid to 3rd party blenders, bottlers & spirits wholesalers throughout the world to bother with tourists.

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The Charles House Whisky c/othewhiskeynut

Liquid like what I found in The Charles House Blended Scotch Whisky.

Now I must admit most of this market is entry level stuff. It usually means they are blends augmented with added caramel – which I can detect & dislike – as well as being chill filtered. There is no pretence to provenance or terroir – in fact there is very little to go on even on the label.

But I don’t drink whisky based on what the label does or doesn’t say.

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Nothing to see here. c/othewhiskeynut

I drink whisky because I enjoy it.

And I certainly enjoyed Charles House.

Why?

When poured into the glass the colour was relatively light – there was caramel on the nose – but not overpowering – and a lovely burnt note which drew me in.

Soft, smooth & slightly sweet grain on the palate – mellow enough as befits an entry level blend – but what’s this coming through?

My mouth began to dry out leaving a prickly tingling on the tongue with a lovely soft ashiness.

Aha! I detect a bit of peat influence in this.

The peat adds a bit of bite – some lovely smoky flavours – and just raises the tasting experience up a notch or two.

It brought a smile to my face.

Sorry Run – I’d much rather go back to Charles House.

Sláinte.

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World Whisky Day 2018

A toast to World Whisky Day.

A toast to whatever type of glassware you use, Túath, Glencairn, tumbler or tall.

A toast to whoever you are. regardless of class, creed, colour or country.

A toast to whatever style of whiskey is in your glass, single malt, single cask, grain, blended, bourbon, rye or hybrid from whatever country’s output you happen to have access to.

A toast to all the farmers, distillers, blenders, bottlers & distributors out there throughout the world that ensure the whiskey we love reaches our lips.

A toast to you – and all fellow whiskey drinkers everywhere.

Remember – the best whiskey is the one in your glass.

Thank you for the day.

Enjoy it.

Sláinte.

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D For Danish Whisky

World Whisky Day is fast approaching on Saturday the 19th May 2018.

As part of the build up I’m featuring a series of blogs – both old and new – over the next month focusing on a country from each letter of the alphabet – if possible – that makes whisky.

Today is D for Danish Whisky.

is also for my downfall as I haven’t actually got round to tasting any of the fabulous whiskies that are made in Denmark.

More famous for it’s bacon than whisky – Denmark has around 14 distilleries either already producing whisky – or about to – according to the excellent Nordic Distillery Map by blogger Whisky Saga which you can view here.

Stauning Whisky would be the most recognised of these distilleries – and one I’d like to get my hands on – as it regularly wins awards and happens to be a style I particularly enjoy – rye!

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Stauning Young Rye c/oStauningWhisky

A return trip to Copenhagen might be in order. Especially as there is a distillery in the town handily named Copenhagen Distillery.

And another not too far away by the name of Braunstein.

It’s about time I got out a bit more!

Sláinte.

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I’d like to thank Stauning Whisky for the use of their photo in this blog.

Arbikie Highland Rye, 2 Year Old, 48%

Scotland 1     :     Ireland 0

At least that’s the situation when it comes to the race for rye.

Despite Kilbeggan sitting on a wonderful 6 year old pot still rye – as tasted at Whiskey Live Dublin here – Arbikie have released a 2 year old Highland Rye.

Being relative newcomers – Arbikie are not bound by ‘tradition’, ‘custom’ or ‘expectation’. This Highland Rye exists outside of the box that is Scottish Whisky Regulations – time for a musical interlude!

As such there is no mention of ‘whisky’ on the label.

Yet rye has always been an integral part of the whisky scene both in Scotland – as well as Ireland – and what Arbikie have done is simply to re-interpret a ‘tradition’ that has been neglected for over a century.

As a self confessed ‘rye head’ I couldn’t pass this up. A bottle was duly ordered.

It’s a bit pricey for 500ml – but the proceeds of the first 100 bottles go to a Motor Neurone charity here.

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Scottish Rye c/othewhiskeynut

I like the simplistic clarity of the no nonsense label – including the large Arbikie logo common throughout their Gin & Vodka range.

I like that Arbikie are a ‘single estate distillery’ using ingredients grown on the estate farm & fields.

And I like the additional information shown on the attractive label; grain variety, field grown in, cask type.  Shades of Mark Reynier at Waterford’s terroir here.

But most of all – I simply love the whole drinking experience of this rye.

4 of us sampled this first Scottish rye for over 100 years – so the following is an amalgamation of our findings.

A wonderful floral bouquet on the nose, hints of varnish, a soft to medium classic white peppery rye spice, warming vanilla & caramel notes from the charred American oak casks.

The taste was suitably smooth, the youthful rye punch delightfully muted by the barley content which added a gentle malt & slight oily influence to the drying rye spices in the well balanced mix.

The finish coated my mouth in that invigorating warm yet dry prickly feel I so enjoy after a great dram.

Superb.

If you only drink one rye this year – make it Arbikie Highland Rye.

Not only does it encapsulate all the classic rye attributes I love – it also adds a unique Scottish mix with the homegrown rye & barley.

A stunning return for Scottish rye.

Sláinte.

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