Tag Archives: The Clash

E for English Whisky

World Whisky Day is fast approaching on Saturday the 19th May 2018.

As part of the build up I’m featuring a series of blogs – both old and new – over the next month focusing on a country from each letter of the alphabet – if possible – that makes whisky.

Today is E for England.

Although I was severely tempted to go for Egyptian Whisky after spotting this very well aged bottle on the internet.

Chefas
Now that’s an age statement! c/ogoogle

Sadly I couldn’t get my hands on a bottle – yet.

First posted March 2018.

COTSWOLDS SINGLE MALT, 46%, ENGLAND

My recent Scottish trip allowed me to indulge in a spot of whisky auctioneering – which is a new method for me to acquire some tasty whisky.

Just Whisky hold monthly online auctions. Any successful bids can be collected from their Fife based warehouse in Dunfermline – only a short drive across the River Forth from Edinburgh where I picked up my airport car.

Now I’m not looking for a Macallan at 30 grand – I’m looking for some bargains I can crack open & enjoy.

I did spot some candidates.

Who would be bidding for a bottle of English whisky in a Scottish auction?

Me.

And I bagged it! Along with a few other choice spirits – of which more later.

It stayed unopened until tea time where over a meal of fish ‘n’ chips – well, it was Friday – glasses were poured & tastings began.

IMG_0688 email
English whisky c/othewhiskeynut

Initially the colour appeared rather dark. But it is aged in ex bourbon casks as well as re-charred red wine barrels.

The label also states non chill filtered & natural colour – music to my ears.

A suitably rich & warm charred cask influence of vanilla & caramel greeted me along with a hint of fruit.

The taste was a little punchy – but mellowed as the clean crisp fruit flavours shone through leaving a lovely dry prickly heat on the finish.

My my!

At barely over 3 years old this is lovely.

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Cotswolds mission statement c/othewhiskeynut

The barley is grown locally to the distillery & traditional floor malting is done nearby too.

Provenance & terroir in your first bottle.

Whoever thinks good whiskey is the domain of only a few chosen countries really needs to wake up and smell the roses – or double cask maturation in this instance.

Slàinte.

Good Logo

PS I also got a tip off about an Ecuador Whisky by the name of Black Castle!

Cotswolds Single Malt, 46%, England

My recent Scottish trip allowed me to indulge in a spot of whisky auctioneering – which is a new method for me to acquire some tasty whisky.

Just Whisky hold monthly online auctions. Any successful bids can be collected from their Fife based warehouse in Dunfermline – only a short drive across the River Forth from Edinburgh where I picked up my airport car.

Now I’m not looking for a Macallan at 30 grand – I’m looking for some bargains I can crack open & enjoy.

I did spot some candidates.

Who would be bidding for a bottle of English whisky in a Scottish auction?

Me.

And I bagged it! Along with a few other choice spirits – of which more later.

It stayed unopened until tea time where over a meal of fish ‘n’ chips – well, it was Friday – glasses were poured & tastings began.

IMG_0688 email
English whisky c/othewhiskeynut

Initially the colour appeared rather dark. But it is aged in ex bourbon casks as well as re-charred red wine barrels.

The label also states non chill filtered & natural colour – music to my ears.

A suitably rich & warm charred cask influence of vanilla & caramel greeted me along with a hint of fruit.

The taste was a little punchy – but mellowed as the clean crisp fruit flavours shone through leaving a lovely dry prickly heat on the finish.

My my!

At barely over 3 years old this is lovely.

IMG_0678 Lr
Cotswolds mission statement c/othewhiskeynut

The barley is grown locally to the distillery & traditional floor malting is done nearby too.

Provenance & terroir in your first bottle.

Whoever thinks good whiskey is the domain of only a few chosen countries really needs to wake up and smell the roses – or double cask maturation in this instance.

Slàinte.

Good Logo

 

 

Inish Turk Beg, Single Malt, 44%

This is one expression that almost got away.

I’ve known about it’s existence for a while.

Originally released in 2010 by a flamboyant entrepreneur who had big plans for the small island off the West coast of Ireland the whiskey is named after – Inish Turk Beg. The whiskey – if nothing else – comes in a very attractive & distinctive bottle with an equally delightful back story.

By 2013 – it was all over.

Nadim Sadek’s dreams were in taters – and the island sold on.

Those lucky enough to purchase a bottle at the time are likely to see the value increase – those that didn’t – tough. Much like the ill fated Titanic – both the Atlantic liner and the whiskey brand of lottery winner Peter Lavery – this ‘Maiden Voyage’ expression is destined to be the last voyage.

Luckily for me – many bars up and down the country still have a bottle you can order a shot from. So when I encountered Inish Turk Beg in the relaxing West Cork Hotel in Skibbereen recently I had a simple choice to make.

To slightly mangle The Clash’s lyrics – should I buy a glass to see what all the fuss was about? Or should I just leave it – never to try it out?

It’s what you call a ‘no brainer’ really.

If – like me – you are curious about all whiskey – what they taste like, what the style is – irrespective as to the country of origin, manufacturer, back story or not – you try it. Preferably soon after the original release. The longer you leave it inevitably 2 things will happen;

1 – The price will go up.

2 – It will all be gone.

So I tasted it.

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Lovely & smooth. c/othewhiskeynut

A very smooth & soft caramelly nose infused with honey, toffee & a slight earthy note.

Very easy sipping. More vanilla & caramel. The earthy note develops more and gives this expression a rather unique character.

A satisfyingly lovely warm glow from the bourbon cask maturation gently fades away on the palate.

Was it worth it?

In short – yes.

The whiskey inside the bottle isn’t exactly earth shattering – but it is a decent dram. There is enough of a twist to make it interesting. Now you could possibly find a bottle of whiskey for the same price as a shot of Inish Turk Beg that would be equally as good – but it wouldn’t have been the same.

You wouldn’t have had the chat & banter with the bar staff and fellow drinkers as to the merits of whiskey, gin & craft beers.

You wouldn’t have bothered to check up the internet to discover the back story to Inish Turk Beg.

And you wouldn’t have enjoyed a dram from a very fancy bottle to satisfy your curiosity and see what it was really like for yourself.

It would have got away.

Good Logo