Tag Archives: Túath Glass

Luzhou Laojiao Zisha Daqu, Baijiu, 52%

Well the whole presentation is a bit of a performance!

Delightful packaging c/othewhiskeynut

Red cloth wrapped around a clay pot!

At 52% – this baijiu is a bit of a performance too.

‘Strong Aroma’ it says on the box – & it does exactly as stated – in a very pleasing way.

Strong Aroma c/othewhiskeynut

An enticing savoury, meaty umami type of thing going on.

The high ABV pack a punch – but doesn’t over power.

The EU/China trade agreement has opened the door for Irish Whiskey exports to China – as well as Baijiu imports to Ireland.

I’m certainly enjoying exploring the fruits of that deal!

Ganbei

I purchased my Baijiu from Asia Market, Dublin.

Johnnie Walker, Irish Whiskey & The Coffey Still.

The iconic ‘Striding Man’ logo gracing bottles of Johnnie Walker Whisky is an apt inspiration for the title of this very highly researched & entertaining book by Nicholas Morgan.

A Striding Man c/othewhiskeynut

Boldly striding across the centuries Johnnie Walker has witnessed many ups & downs as well as twists & turns within the whisky industry.

Originating in 1820 from a Kilmarnock grocers shop specializing in blending tea, Johnnie Walker went on to take full advantage of the Coffey Still to blend whisky.

The book, the whisky & the glass. c/othewhiskeynut

By 1878 the business was expanding massively to cater for demand while both the Highland Malt & the big 4 Dublin Whisky Distilleries mounted a campaign to prevent ‘silent spirit’ being labelled as whisky.

Truths About Whiskey 1878 c/othewhiskeynut

By 1890 Scotch was outselling Irish – up until then the biggest & most reputable whisky sold worldwide – and has done so ever since.

The book chronicles that period of growth for Scotch – blended whisky in particular – as well as many other escapades the Striding Man encountered along the way

A Long Stride is a wonderful read for anyone wishing to grasp the historical complexities & choices made by previous generations that currently shape the whisky industry today.

A rollercoaster of a read. c/othewhiskeynut

It certainly makes me ponder how decisions being made now – often echoing those of the past – will shape the future.

Whatever tomorrow brings the Striding Man – & latterly Striding Woman – will certainly be found playing a key role.

Sláinte

Bacardí Reserva Ocho, Rare Gold Rum, 40%, Puerto Rico

Bacardí Ocho is one of those rums whiskey drinkers can easily appreciate.

Bacardi Ocho c/othewhiskeynut

A dark sweetness of butterscotch & toffee on the nose.

Soft & smooth palate replete with heavy fruits & a touch of nuttiness.

Growing woody spiciness from 8 years in oak barrels add some flair to the long finish.

Label info c/othewhiskeynut

An easy going sipper of a rum found widely in stores around Ireland.

Sláinte

Fubá Cachaca, 40%

Hand crafted in small batches‘ it says on the bottle.

Small Batch Brazil c/othewhiskeynut

Clear colourless unaged cachaca from Brazil.

Quite a pronounced sugarcane grassiness on the nose.

Easy & oily mouthfeel.

Slowly warms the palate with a certain juiciness coming through.

Fubá c/othewhiskeynut

Hints of peppery spice on the finish with a tasty tingling sensation rounding off this attractive spirit.

Available in Ireland from the Intrepid Spirits range.

Saúde

Liberté White Rum, 37.5%, Réunion.

I thought Liberté was a yoghurt brand with TV adverts from a few years ago?

Yet here in my local Lidl was a simple & sparsely labelled bottle of white rum bearing the same name.

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Liberté Rum c/othewhiskeynut

Liberté is a nod to the French connection that still exists on the tiny island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean.

There are 3 rum distilleries operating on Rèunion; Isautier, Rivière Du Mât & Savanna – take your pick as to the source.

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I like it neat myself. c/othewhiskeynut

A clear colourless rum with distinctively fat oily legs.

A very soft mild & mellow nose didn’t give much away – but there was a suggestion of overripe fruits glimpsing through.

Extremely easy on the palate – slightly oily mouthfeel with a gently warming heat.

Letting it linger gradually opens up those funky fruit flavours – not overpowering – just pleasantly attractive – followed by a touch of tingling spice adding some flair to this endearing rum.

The 300 year history of rum distilling on Réunion is quietly imprinted on this charmingly beguiling Liberté White Rum.

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Ship ahoy! c/othewhiskeynut

It floats my boat!

Slàinte

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Locke’s Irish Whiskey, Blend, 40%

This delightfully enjoyable blend almost passed me by.

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Locke’s Irish Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

Released under John Teeling’s tenure at Kilbeggan Distillery – it now seems to have slipped from the current line up of new owners Beam/Suntory.

For the greater part of it’s history the distillery at Kilbeggan went by various names. Originally called Brusna Distillery in 1757 – after the river the waterwheel still turns from to this day – then Locke’s Distillery – after the Locke family who effectively ran the operation from 1843 until closure in 1958.

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Brusna, Locke’s, Kilbeggan entrance c/othewhiskeynut

The distillery licence never expired during the following years. In turn this was acquired by John Teeling’s Cooley Distillery which opened in 1987 and resurrected the Locke’s brand – along with a few others.

Locke’s Distillery only ever produced pot still whiskey – which is perhaps one of many reasons for it’s demise – so ironically this miniature is a blended whiskey – using both grain & malt whiskeys combined together.

The Irish Whiskey Industry were rather late in embracing blended whiskey – over 130 years later than their Scottish counterparts – which also partly explains it’s collapse by the 1960’s.

So in it’s own way – Locke’s Blended Irish Whiskey was part of the revival. I’m glad to have stumbled on this miniature at The Old Stand in Mullingar.

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Locke’s in a Túath Glass c/othewhiskeynut

The colour is light straw – but added caramel cannot be ruled out for this entry level blend.

A lovely soft malt greeted me on nosing. Sweet with just a little hint of turf.

The palate was soft, sweet & very smooth. Eminently approachable. Yet there is a slight suggestion of peat at the end to give it a bit of bite & character.

A decent afterglow wrapped up this extremely enjoyable drinking experience.

Well worth getting hold of if you come across a bottle.

Liquid history.

Sláinte.

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