Tag Archives: Twitter

Grace O’Malley, Dark Rum & Char Casks, Blend, 42%

The rebirth of Irish Whiskey is a wonderful spectacle to witness.

New players in the market are attracted by the phenomenal growth rate and renewed confidence of Irish Whiskey worldwide.

Brands that effectively had monopoly sales are now being challenged by a bold new wave of exciting upstarts that are changing the face of Irish Whiskey.

Proper 12
c/otwitter

This undoubtedly causes a few upsets & disputes.

The status quo is gone.

Irish Whiskey is beginning to mature and is experiencing growing pains.

Whiskey Nut thoroughly welcomes this not entirely unexpected development. – it’s like watching your young teenager learning to drive.

Sure there’ll be some false starts & shaky take-offs – but with trial, error and growing experience – they can become a confident, safe  & skilled driver.

Well Irish Whiskey is back in the driving seat – and it’s a joy to behold.

Every week brings announcements of new & exciting distilleries or brands entering the market.

Brands like Grace O’Malley Whiskey.

Grace
c/oGrace O’Malley Whiskey facebook page

The advertising is bold.

Recalling a true life Pirate Queen figure from Ireland’s rich historical past.

The bottle presentation is brave.

2 (1 of 1)-3
Keeping it all in! c/othewhiskeynut

Enclosed in a black bodice style gaily printed wrap Grace O’Malley Whiskey is certainly eye-catching.

I found the allure irresistible so promptly ordered a bottle from L. Mulligan Whiskey Shop.

Suitably impressed by the presentation – I wasted no time in cracking it open.

2 (1 of 1)
#believeingrace c/othewhiskeynut

The nose displays a joyfully youthful & fresh grain combined with softly sweet malts giving a lovely warmth & gentle spice.

The smooth delivery lulled me in before a gently drying spiciness laden with dark cherries gave added character & depth to the proceedings.

A suitably long finish had an unexpected fruity juiciness appearing at the end just as that gorgeous dryness I enjoy slowly faded.

2 (1 of 1)-2
Grace O’Malley Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

The contents complimented the tales of Grace O’Malley’s exploits with a characterful mouthfeel, lovely depth of flavour and good complexity too.

The price point is a bit on the high side for a blend – even allowing for the wonderful presentation and mature malt content- but I’m pleased to read the owners will be releasing more attractively costed bottles too here.

Grace O’Malley Whiskey is one of the first third party releases using spirit sourced from the Great Northern Distillery – I look forward to many more.

I wish all connected with the brand a safe journey as they set sail into the brave new world of Irish Whiskey.

Sláinte

Good Logo

Paddy Irish Whiskey, Blend, 40%

There’s been a lot of interest in the new design for Paddy’s Irish Whiskey.

Sazerac have recently taken ownership of the brand from Pernod Ricard – it is still made in the New Midleton Distillery in Ireland – and are injecting some money & life into the marketing & labeling of this historic whiskey.

Paddy's
The new Paddy c/otwitter

Die hard fans are not exactly enamoured by the rebrand.

The additional ‘s in Paddy, the additional ‘e’ in whiskey, the altered image of Paddy himself with bowler hat, clover and smile has all caused a degree of ire.

Capture twitter
twitter comment

I see it as the onward development & change inherent within the whiskey industry.

Spotting some bottles in my local Dunnes store when out shopping – also with the extra ‘e’ – I thought it opportune to revisit this blend.

2 (1 of 1)-2
Paddy Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

The nose has that sweet caramelly aroma common to many an entry level blend. It’s relatively grainy neutral otherwise.

The taste is soft & sweet, but develops into a noticeable heat with warming vanilla & caramel dominating.

It’s a robust little dram with a short finish & uncomplicated appeal.

What Paddy Flaherty was dishing out in his legendary sales adventures is in all probability nothing like today’s offering.

To begin with it wouldn’t have been chill filtered. That practice didn’t become common until after the 1940’s or 50’s.

The barley and/or corn raw ingredients were probably organic – as were all grains in a pre-petro chemical agri business environment.

The whiskey Paddy was plying would likely have been a pot still whiskey – a  mix of malted & unmalted barley – and not a blend at all. Irish distillers were reluctant to embrace the new technology of the Coffey Still which kick started the modern whisky industry.

2 (1 of 1)
Paddy no ‘e’ Centenary Whisky c/othewhiskeynut

It also wasn’t until the 1920’s or 30’s that bottling Irish whiskey became the norm. Usually it was sold in barrels to pubs, bars & hotels who dispensed it straight from the cask – a large variation in quality could then ensue.

Even if Carol Quinn – Archivist at Irish Distillers – is sitting on an original Paddy Whisky recipe – it would be difficult to recreate.

The soils would be different, the water would be different, the air would be different, the processes have been altered, the wood for maturation would be different – all factors that in a myriad of ways would alter the taste, texture and flavour of the resulting whiskey.

But we can sit down today and enjoy a glass of Paddy’s Irish Whiskey.

I raise a toast to his memory and the fabulous tales therein of the original brand ambassador.

Sláinte

Good Logo