Category Archives: Irish Whiskey

Westmeath Irish Whiskey, Blend, 40%

If you’re looking for some novelty whiskey then the Celtic Whiskey Shop is the place to go.

They have a range of miniature bottles labelled up in county colours covering the entire Island of Ireland.

Meanwhile, I happened to be in Mullingar recently & picked up their Westmeath Irish Whiskey in the surprisingly well stocked off-licence of The Old Stand on Dominick Street – just round the corner from the railway station.

Not being one to leave a bottle unopened – I poured a glass.

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Westmeath Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

There is no indication as to the source of the whiskey. Kilbeggan Distillery does produce malt in the county of Westmeath – mainly for inclusion in blends – but it didn’t strike me as one of theirs -although this young lad is definitely from Mullingar.

The colour was reassuringly straw like – even if added caramel is predominant in entry level blends.

The nose was rather spirity at first – but calmed down on subsequent tastings to reveal some standard vanilla & caramel notes.

A mild tasting with subtle fruits & more of that bourbon cask influence made it’s presence felt after a rather alcohol forward mouthfeel.

There was a bit of a burn at the end – but nothing too unpleasant. Just a straight forward no-nonsense entry level whiskey.

More novelty than nuanced.

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My thanks to TOMODERA for posting his thoughts on other county whiskeys here.

 

 

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Inish Turk Beg, Single Malt, 44%

This is one expression that almost got away.

I’ve known about it’s existence for a while.

Originally released in 2010 by a flamboyant entrepreneur who had big plans for the small island off the West coast of Ireland the whiskey is named after – Inish Turk Beg. The whiskey – if nothing else – comes in a very attractive & distinctive bottle with an equally delightful back story.

By 2013 – it was all over.

Nadim Sadek’s dreams were in taters – and the island sold on.

Those lucky enough to purchase a bottle at the time are likely to see the value increase – those that didn’t – tough. Much like the ill fated Titanic – both the Atlantic liner and the whiskey brand of lottery winner Peter Lavery – this ‘Maiden Voyage’ expression is destined to be the last voyage.

Luckily for me – many bars up and down the country still have a bottle you can order a shot from. So when I encountered Inish Turk Beg in the relaxing West Cork Hotel in Skibbereen recently I had a simple choice to make.

To slightly mangle The Clash’s lyrics – should I buy a glass to see what all the fuss was about? Or should I just leave it – never to try it out?

It’s what you call a ‘no brainer’ really.

If – like me – you are curious about all whiskey – what they taste like, what the style is – irrespective as to the country of origin, manufacturer, back story or not – you try it. Preferably soon after the original release. The longer you leave it inevitably 2 things will happen;

1 – The price will go up.

2 – It will all be gone.

So I tasted it.

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Lovely & smooth. c/othewhiskeynut

A very smooth & soft caramelly nose infused with honey, toffee & a slight earthy note.

Very easy sipping. More vanilla & caramel. The earthy note develops more and gives this expression a rather unique character.

A satisfyingly lovely warm glow from the bourbon cask maturation gently fades away on the palate.

Was it worth it?

In short – yes.

The whiskey inside the bottle isn’t exactly earth shattering – but it is a decent dram. There is enough of a twist to make it interesting. Now you could possibly find a bottle of whiskey for the same price as a shot of Inish Turk Beg that would be equally as good – but it wouldn’t have been the same.

You wouldn’t have had the chat & banter with the bar staff and fellow drinkers as to the merits of whiskey, gin & craft beers.

You wouldn’t have bothered to check up the internet to discover the back story to Inish Turk Beg.

And you wouldn’t have enjoyed a dram from a very fancy bottle to satisfy your curiosity and see what it was really like for yourself.

It would have got away.

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Clonakilty Irish Whiskey, Virgin Oak Cask, Blend, 43.6%

Maybe if you were an 8th generation farmer growing barley on the fertile soils of West Cork near the historic Galley Head Lighthouse you’d look for a business opportunity that would add value to your crop.

Maybe you’d look for a business that could demonstrate a sense of pride in the beautiful landscape of the wild Atlantic coast you love, a sense of pride in the natural bio-diversity of the area you enjoy and perhaps a business that could stand proud for the next 8 generations of your family.

Maybe opening an Irish Whiskey Distillery on the Wild Atlantic Way in the pretty market town of Clonakilty would fit the bill?

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Waiting for the copper stills. c/othewhiskeynut

For that’s exactly what Michael Scully & all the team behind Clonakilty Distillery have been doing.

I had the privilege to visit the distillery site with founder Michael himself. Currently – February 2018 – it’s a glass fronted empty shell of concrete & steel. A landmark legacy building of the previous boom that was never fully utilised before the crash came. Now Clonakilty Distillery have started works to install 3 gleaming copper pot stills – from Barison in Italy – an additional gin still, associated mashtuns & fermenters as well as all the pipework of a working distillery – the building will be transformed into an iconic tourist attraction in an area already awash with visitors.

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Artist’s drawings. c/othewhiskeynut

The artists drawings of the finished distillery – along with the next door restaurant/cafe showcasing the best culinary delights & locally produced fare that West Cork has to offer – certainly look fabulous.

The views from inside the actual building – overlooking the Clonakilty roofscape & hinterland – are also appealing. Even before the copper stills are in place!

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On the inside looking out. c/othewhiskeynut

A projected finish of late 2018 is proposed for this ambitious project.

This is more than just whiskey.

It’s being part of the wild landscape from where the ingredients are grown.

It’s being part of bustling Clonakilty with it’s tourists, trades people and locals.

It’s embedding these memories & feelings in your mind every time you raise a glass of Clonakilty Whiskey to enjoy.

So what about the whiskey?

The intention is to produce single pot still Irish whiskey – made from locally grown malted & unmalted barley – but that will take a few years. In the meantime a couple of sourced blends will be released  – bearing the distinctive whales tail logo – to fly the flag for Clonakilty Distillery.

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Hail the tail! c/othewhiskeynut

The real whales tails can be spotted locally from one of many whale watching boat-trips that ply the coastline during the season searching for Minke, Fin and the impressive Humpback Whale that occur annually.

You might even be lucky to spot one from the stunning Galley Head Lighthouse itself which you can stay in courtesy of the Landmark Trust here. A truly marvelous experience – even if I didn’t see any whales when I visited a few years ago.

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Galley Head Lighthouse c/othewhiskeynut

The 2 expressions on show are based on a blend of 8 to 10 year old grain & malt ex-bourbon cask matured whiskeys which have been finished by Clonakilty Distillery in their nearby warehouse – I didn’t visit on this occasion – in either virgin american oak casks or port casks. Both are presented at 43.6%, non chill filtered and naturally coloured. Which is always a bonus in my book.

The Port Cask has already been released in Germany. It shows a lovely ruby red appearance & there are some reviews already here.

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Ruby red port cask. c/othewhiskeynut

The Virgin Oak Cask is due for April release in a number of countries & has a far more lighter straw lemon colour about it. Happily I got the chance to sample some of this spirit.

The virgin oak accentuated the vanilla & warm caramel notes which were very forward before a more subdued woody element made it’s presence on a fragrant nose.

The taste is beautifully crisp, fresh & clear with a gently growing glow that warmed me up no end in the chilly February sunlight.

Like the embers of an open fire, the fruity flavours danced around on my palate before gently fading away.

This is not a shy whiskey.

It proudly shows it’s strengths in it’s make up.

It’s  a fine drop indeed to launch such a wonderfully ambitious whiskey project on the Wild Atlantic Way.

Sláinte.

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I’d like to thank Michael Scully for generously taking time out of his busy schedule to show me round the distillery site.

A big shout out too to all the team at Clonakilty Distillery for future success in their whiskey adventures.

 

Craoi na Mona, Single Malt, 40%

Craoi na Mona translates into Heart of the bog.

Living in the Heart of Ireland next door to the Bog of Allen – the largest peat bog in Ireland covering 950 square kms across 9 counties – I just had to try out this Irish Single Malt from Berry Bros & Rudd.

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A glass of the best. c/othewhiskeynut

It celebrates the rich cultural & historical ties Ireland has with these boglands on my doorstep. During the seasons I can smell the burning turf from chimneys on my street, I can see the sods of turf drying in ricks from the motorway as well as a steady stream of tractors & trailers bringing it back home from the bog before the winter sets in.

There are 2 peat – or turf as it is called in Ireland – fired power stations within an hour of my house. A local politician was elected to office on the back of a Turf Cutter’s Association protest over restrictions to bog cutting.

Bogs are the very DNA of Midlands Ireland.

There were 2 whiskey distilleries in Athlone. 2  each in Tullamore, Kilbeggan and Banagher. Birr had up to 4 working distilleries. All within a 30 mile radius and all surrounding the bog with it’s readily available fuel source.

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Turf or peat? c/othewhiskeynut

Turf would have been used in the whiskey making process – either to directly fire the stills and/ or to dry the malted barley – thus influencing the character & taste profile of that whiskey.

By the mid 20th century – all of those distilleries closed. Only one kept it’s licence  – Kilbeggan – and is now back in production after John Teeling & others started the Cooley Distillery back in 1987.

Cooley Distillery reintroduced peat into the Irish whiskey scene with it’s own Connemara range – as well as many third party bottlings.

Sadly by that time – there were no maltsters producing Irish turf dried barley – nor used Irish turf barrels at hand. All who previously did so were long gone. Such raw materials had to be imported from abroad – usually Scotland.

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Sods of turf drying in the sun. c/othewhiskeynut

Craoi na Mona is one such reintroduction.

On the nose there is only a slight welcome waft of smoke on the soft sweet & fruity barley malt.

It’s on tasting a warm roaring turf fire becomes apparent, perfectly balanced by softer fresh fruity notes which start off slightly oily before drifting into a prickly dry sensation.

The smoke lingered like a softly glowing fire at home after an evenings entertainment.

This is a delightfully fresh & almost youthful expression that pleased me no end. I could have stayed all day to embrace it’s charms.

It’s a pity it takes an outside independent bottler to salute the history & tradition of turf cutting in Ireland – but it’s one I’m glad to see.

I just can’t wait for a bottle of Irish whiskey made using Irish turf. Due to the different species of plant that make up that turf – the resultant taste profile will not be the same as Scottish peat – nor Tasmanian peat for that matter – as I found out when I visited that wonderful island here. It’s what’s called ‘terroir’ – and has sadly been missing for a while. Thankfully Nephin Whiskey in Mayo are planning to malt Irish barley with Irish peat as their inaugural release.

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Nephin barrel top c/othewhiskeynut

Craoi na Mona has been out for a number of years in various expressions. It’s not commonly encountered. But if you do come across it – go for it!

The heart of Ireland – in a bottle.

Sláinte.

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Garavan’s Grocer’s Choice 10 Year Old Single Malt, 46%

Only the other day I was remarking there would be an increase in bars releasing their own label whiskey when;

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Wham c/opinterest

Out of the hat pops the Dead Rabbit whiskey.

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Dead Rabbit Irish Whiskey c/oTheDeadRabbit

Shortly followed by a Garavan’s 10yo single malt!

I get as excited as a kid at Christmas with every new Irish whiskey release. In this instance it was a lot easier to visit a pub only an hour down the road – rather than a trans-atlantic flight across the pond – for me to sample one of these bottles!

Garavan’s is a gem of a whiskey bar. One of the 12 venues on the Galway Whiskey Trail. It has warm wooden snugs & paneling, loads of whiskey coupled with friendly welcoming & informed staff. What more could a whiskey fan ask for?

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Garavan’s Single Malt c/othewhiskeynut

I ordered up my Garavan’s Grocer’s Choice 10 Year Old Irish Whiskey – neat as is my way – & awaited the joys that were within.

The nose opened up with some playful fruity notes – this whiskey isn’t shy about coming forward – with some rich vanilla & caramel from the bourbon cask maturation.

The taste was a delight. No holding back here either. Clear, crisp & fresh. More of that warming bourbon influence with a soft prickly spice too.

The finish was suitably long & mellow – yet left a satisfying lingering heat. Time for a tune for the recently departed.

I liked the no nonsense label too. It harks back to bygone days when brown paper bags were the norm – deliveries were done on a bone shaker & each grocer had their own whiskey – from sourced distilleries!

There is no mention on the bottle as to the origin of the spirit within. Under both Irish and Scottish whiskey rules there is no legal requirement to do so – and I’m happy with that.

I don’t judge a whiskey by the cover.

I judge by the contents.

And the contents taste lovely!

Only when I blew up the photos  – I’m of an age when all of a sudden the small print has become a bit of a blur – did I see some of the reasons why.

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And the magic number is… c/othewhiskeynut

46% in whiskey terms is a magic number. It usually denotes non chill filtration. On my palate at least that means bigger & bolder flavours – more taste sensation & more warming heat. All of which Garavan’s Grocer’s Choice possesses in spades.

There is no mention of added caramel – but the bold clarity of the flavours suggests not.

There are plans to release the whiskey for retail – but in the meantime it’s only available at Garavan’s bar.  For me – it’s the best place to experience this fabulous new Irish whiskey – having the craic & sharing the friendly banter with both regular customers and welcoming bar staff.

Sure what are you waiting for?

Time to head West.

Sláinte.

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Burn’s Night 2018

There are a number of factors mitigating against holding a Burn’s Night in the heart of Ireland.

One of them is the difficulty in finding a haggis for sale in Westmeath!

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Haggis! c/othewhiskeynut

Thankfully I brought some of the prize pudding back with me from a recent Scottish trip – along with some whisky I had in mind – which is my cue for a song!

So January 25th found me in Sean’s Bar – the oldest bar in Ireland – hosting an Irish versus Scotch blind whiskey tasting.

I’d decided to go blind –  the whiskey that is, not me – wrapping the bottles in tinfoil to disguise the brands – so there would be no bias in the results. The nose & taste of the spirit would be the crucial factor.

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Blind tasting. c/othewhiskeynut

I roughly paired the whiskeys into 4 categories.

‘a’ being grains,

‘b’ obviously blends,

‘c’ single malts &

‘d’ being undefined – which will become clearer later. I tried as far as possible to get pairs of equal cost, style, flavour & profile – with only 50% success. The idea was to get a winner for each pair – then a ‘best of’ for the evening – having some fun along the way.

Votes were cast at the end of the tasting round to get the 4 individual winners – as well as the overall winner – before any of the whiskeys were revealed to some surprised faces.

The first winner of the evening was Egan’s Vintage Grain.

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Egan’s Vintage Grain c/othewhiskeynut

I’ve featured this single grain previously in a blog here. For a grain whiskey Egan’s delivers some punch both in flavour & style which didn’t go unnoticed by the audience. Most of them assumed it was a Scotch. 1st surprise of the evening.

I’d cheekily paired this with McDowell’s No 1 – the 2nd biggest selling brand of whisky in the world. This is actually a blend of Scotch, malt & neutral spirit – as it says on the label. Guinness Nigeria is also on the label – although McDowell’s is distilled in India by a company founded back in 1898 by a Scotsman unsurprisingly named McDowell.

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McDowell’s back label c/othewhiskeynut

Some 90% of all whiskey sold throughout the world is blended. So category ‘b’ is the real battle ground. The winner of the evening?

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Sean’s Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

Well – being held in Sean’s Bar what else would you expect? But remember – this was a blind taste test and not all the participants had tried either of the entrants before.

The other bottle was named after an Irishman. Ernest Shackleton was born in Co Kildare in 1874 and went on to became a famous Antarctic Explorer. This blend I found a rather weak representation of a whisky he took to those frozen lands in the early 1900’s. My audience seemed to agree.

The single malts also had a clear winner. It gives me great pleasure to announce the wonders of this whiskey.

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26yo Irish Reserve c/othewhiskeynut

Aldi 26 Year Old Irish Reserve just keeps on giving.

I’d paired this with the Dalmore Valour which delivers quite a nice rich, dry port & sherry finish to the palate. It’s youthfulness probably let it down when compared to the depth of flavour of the Irish 26yo. On a price front however – they are comparable.

The last category contained spirit which is not currently available in both countries. Ireland has it’s single pot still whiskey made with a mash of malted and unmalted barley. While Scotland has just released it’s 1st rye for over 200 years. The winning margin in this case wasn’t as wide as previous categories – but a winner there was.

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Scottish Rye c/othewhiskeynut

The cleaner, bolder, more upfront spice hit of Arbikie Highland Rye gave Scotland it’s only winner of the evening. There were a few surprised faces during sampling on this one – and even more when it was revealed – but clearly rye is a style to be reckoned with – and I can’t wait for that 6 year old Kilbeggan rye to be released. Unfortunately Green Spot just didn’t hit the high notes in this round.

Of all the category winners – in fact of all the entrants – I’d asked for a favourite for the evening. The 67% majority vote took me a little by surprise.

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Aldi 26yo wins out! c/othewhiskeynut

What else can I say but congratulations to Aldi & all the team that were behind this amazing release.

The bottle was drained, the haggis was shared out, and the participant that turned out immaculately attired in a kilt was duly given a bottle of whisky by way of a prize.

I’d like to thank all those that attended. I thoroughly enjoyed myself and from comments on the evening, everyone else did too! Big thanks also to Sean’s Bar for hosting the event. By the sounds of it – we’ll be back for more!

Slàinte.

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Dundalgan 10 Year Old Single Malt, 40%

Mindful I’ve been bigging up the excellent Aldi 26yo Irish Reserve. In the interests of fairness & partiality I couldn’t leave out seeing what the other German retailer Lidl had to offer on the whiskey front.

The pre-christmas special on the shelves seemed to be their own label Dundalgan 10yo Single Malt – which I eventually got round to sampling.

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Lidl 10yo SM & Charred Cask blend c/othewhiskeynut

Being a supermarket release – I’m not expecting ‘non chill-filtered’ anywhere on the label. Nor am I expecting any sense of provenance – let alone the name of the field or even the variety of barley used for the terroir.

What I am expecting to find is exactly what it says on the rather plain & simple label.

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All you need to know. c/othewhiskeynut

At 30 euro – what else would you be looking for other than the basic legal requirements?

Oh! It does add ‘aged in bourbon casks’ – but there is no mention of added caramel – (which is probably in there) – nor the distillery that made it – (Cooley would be my guess) – because it doesn’t have to. If you want that kind of information – buy something else.

On the nose it’s very inviting. Soft, smooth, the usual vanilla & caramel notes, whilst Mrs Whiskey found pleasant floral aromas with hints of orange & spice.

It didn’t disappoint on tasting either. A very easy mellow vanilla to begin with, hints of maltiness, followed by a lovely growing heat with just a dash of peppery spice to give it a lift.

A rather gentle medium finish rounded off this extremely pleasant & easy drinking single malt.

It doesn’t have the depth of the Aldi 26yo – but then it’s under half it’s age and 60% the price – and I certainly found the Dundalgan 10yo surprisingly enjoyable.

If only all supermarket whiskeys were this good!

A cheeky little number from Lidl.

Sláinte.

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Peaky Blinder Irish Whiskey, 40%

Every now and then a TV show comes along which just seems to capture the imagination.

Peaky Blinder on BBC 2 has certainly done that.

With a growing fanbase worldwide and racking up big viewing figures, the show is now available on Netflix.

There’s a strong Irish link in the story line, Irish actors pepper the cast and a lot of the ‘behind the scenes’ crew are Irish too.

So it’s entirely fitting an enterprising company would release a trio of spirits – gin, rum and whiskey – on the back of the show – and that the whiskey in question is Irish Whiskey.

I couldn’t wait to get hold of a bottle!

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Peaky Blinder Irish Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

Now there has been some controversy over the term ‘Product Of The British Isles’ printed on the label – which incidentally is common to both the gin & rum too.

As a geographical term – technically it’s correct. Ireland is part of the British Isles. But the term has geo-political implications which you can read about here from Wikipedia.

Such disputes would not have deterred gang leader Tommy Shelby from plying his trade – and nor will it stop my pastime of drinking whiskey.

So? Is it any good?

Well. To start off with. It looks like some of the aforementioned Mr Shelby’s victims have been allowed to bleed all over the mixing barrel. The colour is a deep ruby red which even allowing for ‘Aged In Sherry Casks’ seems a bit dark. Much like a lot of the excellent music featured in the show.

The nose follows on in this theme with rich sweet & dark notes with a bit of depth. I’m suspecting Oloroso or PX casks were used to get the very inviting aromas here,

The taste is – well – WOW!

I wasn’t expecting this from a reasonably priced blend,

Now it does start off rather softly – just like Mr Shelby sweet talking to you. The gentle sweetness & warmth guiles you in.

Then POW!

A gorgeous hit of rich, dry prickliness envelopes the mouth with soft spice & tangy fruits.

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Don’t mess with the Peaky Blinders c/otheinternet

Like a blow from Tommy – you are left reeling from the experience as the dry sensation slowly fades.

This is very nice.

So who is behind the blend?

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Sadler’s c/othewhiskeynut

Sadler’s are a brewery based in the West Midlands of the UK. They obtained the whiskey from Halewood International who are a marketing & distribution company with worldwide reach based in Liverpool. Halewood previously released The Pogues Irish Whiskey – to much acclaim – which was produced for them by West Cork Distillers in Skibbereen.

Draw your own conclusions.

I’ve drawn mine.

From the Peaky Blinders gang – this is a belter of a blend!

Sláinte.

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Oh! Hot off the Press!

If you want a Peaky Blinder taster – how about this!

Sadler's
c/o Sadler’s

 

Egan’s Vintage Grain, Single Grain, 46%

There is an outpouring of new Irish Whiskey releases marking the growing interest in the category both by consumers – as well as companies trying to enter the market.

Egan’s  are slightly unusual in that they are a company re-entering the market after a long absence.

Back in the mid 1800’s – when Irish Whiskey would have been the world’s most popular – P & H Egan built up a sizeable business in their home town of Tullamore importing wines, maturing & bottling whiskey, malting & general groceries – which you can read about here.

Former generations of the present day Egan family – who have released this bottle in question – were a well respected & prosperous company in the Midlands of Ireland. They added to the architecture of the town by building the fine Bridge House Hotel as their head office. The building now proudly adorns their latest offerings.

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Egan’s Vintage Grain c/othewhiskeynut

Whilst many of Tullamore’s bars proudly display Egan’s products of the past.

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Egan’s advertising in The Brewery Tap c/othewhiskeynut

Following on in the family tradition, the 21st Century Egans also do not distill their own whiskey – they source it from third parties – but they do wrap it in a visually attractive label that proudly displays their heritage & connections to Tullamore.

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The Bridge House Hotel c/othewhiskeynut

This Vintage Grain offering is a single grain presented at a powerful 46% with no chill filtering.  Always a bonus in my book.

Now single grain may need a bit of an explanation. ‘Single’ implies it comes from one distillery. Not as many assume made from one type of grain. Different types of grain may be used – usually barley, corn, wheat or rye – but they all must be distilled in a continuous, or commonly called, Coffey Still.

The resultant distillate is usually of a higher strength with less taste & flavour of the batch distilled malt whiskey and consequently spends more time in wooden barrels to impart those lovely aromas that are released upon nosing & tasting the whiskey.

Vintage Grain is matured in ex-bourbon barrels for between 6 to 8 years to impart those lovely vanilla & soft caramel notes associated with this type of ageing.

Both the nose and initial tasting is fresh, clean & clear, which suggests no added caramel to my palate – another bonus for me.

The smooth vanilla notes slowly morph into a soft peppery spice which gently fades to a wonderfully warm finish.

This is a worthy addition to the growing Irish single grain category which definitely benefits from it’s higher strength and more natural presentation.

Couple that taste with the wonderfully  rich historical back story of the Egan family and you have a winning combination.

I certainly raise a glass to the present day Egan family and wish them future success in re-establishing their name in the proud annuls of Irish Whiskey’s ongoing story.

Sláinte.

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I’d like to thank Killian & Jonathan Egan for the generous sample provided for the purposes of this review.

My Whiskey Release Of 2017

I usually shy away from picking a release of the year, especially when there has been a bumper crop of new & exciting Irish Whiskeys to choose from, let alone the rest of the world.

But when push comes to shove – there could only be one for me.

It’s not just down to the wonderfully satisfying taste – although that is important – it’s also about the whole package.

The anticipation.

The hunt to find a bottle.

The internet flurry.

And the eventual sampling.

My whiskey release of 2107 is;

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26yo Irish Reserve c/othewhiskeynut

Aldi 26 Year Old Irish Reserve.

From the first hints that Aldi were going to release a 26yo Irish Single Malt for 50 euro the internet was awash with incredulation, surprise & speculation as to who was behind it.

The release date arrived & many punters queued up to get a bottle.

But not all the shops had it in stock!

From Aberdeen to Aberystwyth, Bangor to Ballincollig whiskey fans went on a chase to find their prey. The chat sites lit up with where the whiskey was found. Success stories abounded & commiserations given to failed hunts.

Having previously commentated in a blog entitled ‘Irish Whiskey – Which Way Forward?‘ regarding the Irish Whiskey Industry essentially leaving this area of the marketplace free for Scotch – my question was firmly & positively answered in the affirmative.

Not only that.

When the reviews came in, many rated the Irish offering better than the 29yo Scotch.

To me the Aldi Irish Reserve represents the growing interest in Irish whiskey.

It’s taking Irish Whiskey into new markets.

New ways of releasing whiskey.

And gaining new customers.

It’s malt for the masses.

My only wish is there will be more in the pipeline.

For those that managed to track down a bottle – enjoy.

For those that failed – it’s already being advertised on the secondary market.

Congratulations to all involved in it’s release – whoever you may be.

Sláinte.

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My thanks to PoorMan’sWhiskyJournal for the inspiration behind this blog.