Jatt Life, Blended Irish Whiskey, 40%

There are Irish Whiskey brands existing catering soley for markets outside of Ireland.

Jatt Life in Tuath

That’s Jatt Life.

I picked this bottle up on a recent UK visit.

That’s Jatt Life.

The publicity is slick, contemporary, very active on social media & appears to target a demographic & culture of bling that wouldn’t include myself.

That’s Jatt Life.

Jatt Life info

There’s little information on the bottle – but tasting & enjoying the contents is my motivation.

That’s Jatt Life.

A lovely rich nose redolent of succulent dark fruits complemented by hints of woody oak.

The mouthfeel is deep & luxurious.

More woody spice comes through leaving a dry tingling on the long finish.

That’s Jatt Life.

Often virgin oak maturation can be quite aggressive – but additional finishing with sherry oak has introduced a wonderful luscious rich fruity interplay.

That’s Jatt Life.

Enjoying Jatt Life

A very engaging & characterful blend.

Congratulations to Jatt Life – expanding the Irish Whiskey category.

Sláinte

All images courtesy Whiskey Nut

Sheep Dog, Peanut Butter, 35%, Liqueur

Walking the Fife Coastal Path – as you do – the auld foot blisters needed a rest.

Herself texted to say meet in the Wemyss Central Hotel.

Central Hotel c/othewhiskeynut

Who was I to refuse?

The others were already on the Guinness – I opted for Belhaven Best – but spotted an odd bottle on the spirits shelf.

Sheep Dog c/othewhiskeynut

I’ve encountered Sheep Dip before – but not Sheep Dog!

A dram was ordered.

Turns out it’s a ‘liqueur blended with peanut butter flavour and whiskey’, bottled by Sazerac.

Nutty c/othewhiskeynut

Certainly nosed like peanut butter.

Rich, sweet & syrupy on the palate.

All rounded off by a warming embrace of whiskey.

Rather a bit too sugary sweet for my liking – but certainly an entertaining drink which raised my spirits after the long walk.

Sláinte

An Fear Grinn, Móinteach, Single Malt, 46%

Having moved house during the pandemic this generous sample from the good people at An Fear Grinn almost went missing.

Móinteach time! c/othewhiskeynut

Luckily the new owners of my old abode kindly informed me of the package & it duly graced my happy hands.

What a delight it proved to be!

Móinteach – roughly translates as peaty – exhibited those lovely rich smokey aromas I adore.

Clean & clear – yet not overpowering.

The palate was milder & sweeter than nosing suggested.

Móinteach came alive on the finish for me.

A gorgeous drying out, tingling sensation – reminding me of the warm glow from the fading embers of a hearty fire wrapping me in it’s comforting embrace.

c/oCelticWhiskeyShop

Móinteach – my kinda whiskey!

Fercullen Amarone Cask Finish, Single Grain, 46%

I can’t help feeling single grain whiskey is still trying to escape the slur Messers Jameson x2, Roe & Power attached to it back in 1879 labelling the category as ‘Silent Whisky’ in their anti-Coffey-Still publication ‘Truths About Whisky’.

Truths About Whiskey 1879 c/othewhiskeynut

Powerscourt Distillery’s latest Fercullen Amarone Cask Finish Single Grain is anything but silent.

Fercullen Amarone c/oCelicWhiskeyClub

There’s a bright inviting nose bursting with soft, sweet juiciness.

Very expressive indeed.

Gentle & sweet on the palate.

Grows with intensity exhibiting a warming glow, hints of nuttiness & an engaging tingly finish.

Sample tasting c/othewhiskeynut

Fercullen Amarone expands the horizons of the single grain category.

Sláinte

This sample was tasted as part of the online Celtic Whiskey Club events calendar.

Lough Ree Distillery, The Bridge Series, Barley Harbour, Single Malt, Single Cask, 46%

Barley Harbour is the latest release from Lough Ree Distillery’s Bridge Series.

Barley Harbour c/othewhiskeynut

Named after an actual berthing point on Lough Ree itself, The Bridge Series tides the distillery over until their own whiskey is ready.

I happily encountered Barley Harbour at the wonderfully reconvened ‘live’ Midlands Craft Beer Festival at Don’s Bar in Moate.

Presented in an elegantly elongate bottle bearing the striking Lough Ree Distillery logo, Barley Harbour is offered at 46%, non chill filtered & natural colour – as are all The Bridge series.

Gone fishing c/othewhiskeynut

Sourced from a certain Northern distillery which usually presents it’s whiskey at 40%, chill filtered & added caramel – Lough Ree – as independent bottlers – provide a marvelous opportunity to taste the full potential of this ex-bourbon matured six & a half year old.

Lovely clarity of flavour.

Rich & engaging mouthfeel.

A gorgeously long lasting finish.

Chatting to one of the founders – inbetween a few tasty beers! – it appears there will be some very exciting developments from Lough Ree Distillery shortly.

As it is, Barley Harbour is an excellent single malt Irish whiskey to savour & enjoy.

Catch it while you can!

Sláinte

Moore’s Irish Whiskey, 40% & Moore’s Irish Cream Liqueur, 17%

The growing sales & popularity of Irish Whiskey continues to attract new entrants into the category.

Lockdown Brands – you can guess when they were formed – recently released their Moore’s range of spirits.

Moore’s miniatures c/othewhiskeynut

Launched without fanfare or fuss – I picked a miniature pack up in the excellent Celtic Whiskey Shop on my sojourn to Wetherspoons new Keavin’s Port Hotel in Dublin.

Moore’s Whiskey c/othewhiskeynut

Moore’s Irish Whiskey sports a proud stag on the label – with little else over and above the legal requirements.

There’s a sweet sherried depth to the nose, the usual caramel flavours & a bit of a spirity kick.

Smooth, honeyed & mouth coating, the palate gently hugs in an warming embrace.

An engaging dry tingling fades slowly away on the finish.

With ever more esoteric cask finishes & proclamations of provenance – the stripped back simplicity & no nonsense approach of Moore’s is refreshing.

Moore’s Cream Liqueur c/othewhiskeynut

Mariah Carey dominates social media with her Black Irish liqueur – but Moore’s Irish Cream Liqueur faces no legal dispute – as far as I know – and is currently available to purchase in Ireland.

Rather than sporting a golden mermaid look, Moore’s is adorned with a humble grazing cow – the source of the Irish cream used.

In the glass Moore’s Irish Cream Liqueur has the appearance & consistency of rich full-fat milk about it.

Only on nosing & tasting does a whisper of whiskey make it’s presence felt over the rich creaminess & melted milk chocolate experience.

An Irish Wolfhound graces Moore’s Irish Gin – but never having acquired an appreciation of this juniper led category – I’ll leave it to others for appraisal.

Overall I’m somewhat attracted to the laid back & simple approach offered by Moore’s.

There’s a traditional appeal to the honeyed blend style of whiskey.

The brand also puts Co Laois on the spirits map.

Best wishes to Moore Drinks & Lockdown Brands in their new venture.

Keavin’s Port, Dublin. Wetherspoon’s Irish Expansion.

Wetherspoons divide opinion.

Spoons news & menu c/othewhiskeynut

When they first appeared in North London back in the 1980’s – I was there.

One of their earliest bars – The Rochester Castle – became a frequent haunt of mine – & I’ve been in many since.

The Wetherspoon model – which is still in use today – was relatively radical at the time.

No piped music.

No TV screens.

No slot machines.

No smoking areas.

Food served all day.

Free refills of tea & coffee.

Varying taps of ‘real ale’ offered at decent prices.

Little did I know nearly 40 years later I’d be looking forward to a weekend away with herself staying in the newly opened €33 million Keavin’s Port Hotel & Bar to enjoy that very same model!

Keavin’s Hotel & Bar c/othewhiskeynut

Most of those monies were spent on the careful & detailed restoration of the 8 Georgian Town Houses – plus 1 Chapel – the premises now occupy.

Confessions in the Chapel? c/othewhiskeynut

Pictures, memorabilia & artifacts recalling the former uses of the buildings now adorn the space. From specially commissioned stained glass work of church providers Early & Company to the marvelous inclusion of the former Chapel into a dining area.

Window at reception c/othewhiskeynut

The modern hotel is discretely added on at the back & boasts sleekly designed contemporary rooms with all the expected mod cons – plus the lovely touch of artwork from local schools commissioned by Wetherspoons.

Room artwork c/othewhiskeynut

The bar areas include a stunning 12 metre high glass atrium, 2 beer gardens & cosy snugs within the old Georgian building.

Atrium with bar & beer garden below c/othewhiskeynut

Prices are very keen – Top Brands – Sensible Prices is the tag line – although I was a tad disappointed at the lack of an Irish flavour.

Keen prices c/othewhiskeynut

Opting for a Kenyan Tusker Lager – whose malty body provided a pleasing flavour profile – herself enjoyed a Gunpowder G’n’T from Drumshanbo.

Tusker time! c/othewhiskeynut

Wetherspoon stalwarts of Hobgoblin, Ringwood & Abbot were on tap – no Irish representation here yet – although Beamish & Franciscan Well are available in pint & cans.

Despite being open for less than a week – with a few minor teething problems – the hotel & bar were packed. At one point the very friendly, helpful & courteous staff informed us they had to turn folks away to keep the numbers manageable!

A convivial & jovial atmosphere ensured a mighty evening – whether it was because of the All Ireland Final the following day or folks out for the first time post easing of COVID restrictions remains unknowable.

The controversial & outspoken head of Wetherspoon, Tim Martin, may continue to outrage – though the model of affordable drinking & dining in a bright, architecturally attractive, friendly & comfortably atmospheric space continues to pull in the punters.

Keavin’s Port Bar c/othewhiskeynut

Would you choose to drink at Wetherspoons?

Sláinte

Saison Rum Tasting, 40% to 48%, Barbados, Jamaica & Trinidad

The diversity & quality of rums within the Saison Rum range impressed me very much.

Saison rum tasting c/othewhiskeynut

Part of the excellent Celtic Whiskey Bar & Larder tasting series. As usual I missed the actual live Zoom event – but tuned in later on YouTube for more information about Saison Rum.

My brief tasting notes – in italics – were gathered catching the last of the summer sun in my back garden before watching the video.

Saison Pale Rum, 40%

Pale straw, lovely fresh pungency, reminiscent of sugar cane rum, grassy. Soft, mellow & mouth coating. Gorgeously warm spiciness on the finish.

Lovely!

Saison Rum, 42%

Golden brown, inviting hint of funk in a rich demerara cake. Sweet, smooth & warming. Dries out on the finish in a lip smacking finalé.

Gorgeous!

Saison Sherry Cask Rum, 42%

Golden brown, soft, sweet juicy fruity wine gums. Mild & mellow. Quite light on the finish with a lovely dry tingling.

Grand.

Saison Reserve Rum, 43.5%

Golden brown, soft sweet funk. Richness & depth. Mellow funky finish. A luxurious rum – well balanced & civil.

Saison Barbados 5yo, 46%

Pale brown, sweet fruit cake. Mild. Combination of sweetness & spice with a tingling finish.

One for the sweet tooth!

Saison Trinidad, 7yo, 48%

Pale brown, mild & sweet. Soft palate. Sugar & spice & all things nice.

Dessert rum!

A very enjoyable tasting indeed!

From a funky start to a dessert finish with extremely well balanced & complex rums inbetween – Saison Rum have a bottle to suit every taste.

Using rum sourced from Barbados, Jamaica & Trinidad, French Cognac House Tessendier have recently branched out into rum blending with this gorgeous Saison Rum range.

The rums are shipped to France in bulk at cask strength for careful blending & further maturation in cognac casks. Presented non chill filtered with no added sugar – the results are full of flavour & joie de vivre that my palate enjoys.

Personally my preference veers towards the younger – more brasher – funkiness of the non age statement offerings.

I found the sweetness of the Sherry Cask & Single Origin bottles a touch too much.

Flavoursome rum c/othewhiskeynut

In a close contest Saison Rum won the day with it’s solid dollop of Jamaican dunder.

Which one would your palate pick?

Hat’s off to Saison Rum!

Santé!

Bottle shots courtesy Vintus & Celtic Whiskey Shop.

Armagh Craft Cider, Dry, 4.5%

After tasting the Craft Cider Battered Haddock Fillets a few weeks ago – I thought a gargle of the cider wouldn’t go amiss.

Armagh Cider c/othewhiskeynut

Armagh Craft Cider comes in Sweet, Medium & Dry versions – I choose Dry as it suits my palate best.

Fresh fruity apple nose.

Very easy in the mouth.

It’s on the finish the orchard notes come to the fore.

Back story c/othewhiskeynut

A pleasing summer evening’s tipple.

Sláinte

Kinahan’s Kasc M, 45%, Single Malt

A 2021 Irish Whiskey Association (IWA) report stated 96% of the whiskey made in Ireland is destined for sales abroad.

This allows many companies to exclusively target that market – without selling in the Auld Sod!

Kinahan’s are one of them.

Kasc M c/othewhiskeynut

Proudly displaying a long heritage back to 1779 – Kinahan’s describe themselves as pioneers.

My first encounter was at The Dead Rabbit in NYC.

The Dead Rabbit NYC c/othewhiskeynut

Kinahan’s 10yo Single Malt was a pleasing fruity offering in a bourbon country that reminded me of home.

My next meeting was more pioneering.

The Kasc Project advertising caught my eye & the unconventional hybrid barrels intrigued.

Hybrid cask c/othewhiskeynut

Using casks made up of staves from various woods – Portuguese Oak, American Oak, Hungarian Oak, French Oak & Chestnut – gave the youthful Kasc B – for blend – a complexity & depth of flavour normally found in older aged whiskeys.

Very enjoyable!

A further encounter resulted in Kasc M – the latest single malt incarnation.

Kasc in a Tuath c/othewhiskeynut

Sweet honeyed nose with hints of nuttiness & deeper depth.

Very smooth & mouth coating initially – before a mélange of complex flavours danced merrily on the palate.

Builds to a prickly tingling sensation leaving a lasting dryness gently fading away.

I really enjoyed this one!

Riot c/othewhiskeynut

It may be a riot of wood – but it’s more a harmony of flavour.

The interaction of diverse woods within the hybrid cask has brought about a fabulous melting pot of notes complimenting each other in a balanced performance.

The 45% strength & non chill filtration also help to showcase the whiskey.

It’s enough to tempt me abroad!

Sláinte

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